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 Finley Peter Dunne

"to afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted"

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updated Thu. November 23, 2017

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... to remind me of Mr. Dooley, an Irish-American character created by the late 19th century Chicago newspaper columnist Finley Peter Dunne.
... an Irish-American character created by the late 19th century Chicago newspaper columnist Finley Peter Dunne. "Sure, politics ain't bean-bag ...

That is as true today as when the fictional Dooley (thanks to Finley Peter Dunne) suggested the media's mission nearly 100 years ago.
It comes down to Finley Peter Dunne's famous advice to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. "As long as you're afflicting someone in ...
Now, politics ain't beanbag, as articulated by writer Finley Peter Dunne's Mr. Dooley. But still - if candidates are to debate their ideas and parry ...
Humorist Finley Peter Dunne wrote that the mission of newspapers is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Looking back, we ...

But he competed fiercely and responded in kind to personal attacks, often quoting a favorite fellow Irishman, Finley Peter Dunne, that "politics ...
"Not surprisingly, in this administration, if a choice has to be made between taking steps to help the needy, in this case students, or the taxpayer ...
"politics ain't bean-bag," said Mr. Dooley, a character created by the humorist Finley Peter Dunne (d. 1936). But it also ain't horseshoes--in ...
The phrase dates back to 1895, when writer Finley Peter Dunne used it as a quote from his fictional character Mr. Dooley, an Irishman who ...
On October 7, 1893, Chicago Evening Post journalist and humorist Finley Peter Dunne introduced his readers to the character of Mr. Dooley in ...
politics "ain't beanbag," said Finley Peter Dunne's 19th century fictional character, Mr. Dooley, an Irish barkeep.
Wikipedia suggests it's from Finley Peter Dunne's "Mr. Dooley" character - but that's in a bit where he needles newspapers for playing various ecclesiastical roles, so it's possible he's borrowing a line there from the preachers.
Poynter reported that the first known use of the phrase was from 1902, written by journalist and humorist Finley Peter Dunne. O'Keefe says he isn't done. He's calling on volunteers to comb through the 119 hours of raw tape, and is offering a $10,000 ...
Chicago Evening Post journalist and humorist Finley Peter Dunne gets at least partial credit for another old saying, that "a newspaper's job is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable".
Subscribe to The Atlantic's politics & Policy Daily, a roundup of ideas and events in American politics. "No matter whether the Constitution follows the flag or not," Finley Peter Dunne's Mr. Dooley said long ago in an obsolete dialect, "the Supreme ...
"No matter whether the country follows the flag or not, the Supreme Court follows the election returns," wrote the Chicago humorist and author Finley Peter Dunne in 1901. More than a century later, many legal scholars and Historians take Dunne's famous ...

Maybe now the country can acknowledge at last that the Supreme Court is no longer a court at all -- that, as newspaper columnist Finley Peter Dunne's fictional Irish bartender, Martin J. Dooley, opined more than a century ago, "The Supreme Court ...
The 19th century writer Finley Peter Dunne first said that it is the job of newspapers to "comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.
Rather it's there, as Finley Peter Dunne famously said, to "comfort the afflicted, afflict the comfortable.'' And tell the truth.
Still, it's hard not to credit the peasant shrewdness of humourist Finley Peter Dunne's fictional Irish immigrant, Mr. Dooley.
In that vein, Finley Peter Dunne, who penned a Chicago newspaper column in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, once wrote something that has been interpreted over the years to mean, "The job of the newspaper is to comfort the afflicted and afflict ...
For decades, I have carried the same battered Penn State folder with endless iterations of the journalistic credo I hold most sacred, journalist Finley Peter Dunne's "The job of a newspaper is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable." On ...
But Americans knew little or nothing about that distant archipelago, or as the American satirist Finley Peter Dunne, AKA the Irish bartender Mr. Dooley, put it in his wonderful brogue, Americans barely knew if The Philippines were islands or canned goods.
Although he left Chicago in 1919, Lardner was firmly in the tradition of great Chicago columnists, such as Mike Royko and Finley Peter Dunne. Royko, who dominated Chicago journalism commentary for four decades, created as his alter ego a working-class ...
philosophical barkeep Mr. Dooley, creation of humorist Finley Peter Dunne. Charles Andrews has lived in Santa Monica for 30 years and wouldn't live anywhere else in the world.
All of this provides fodder for the awards committee, which is governed by the observation of American humorist Finley Peter Dunne that it's the job of a newspaper to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Are all of these awards fair ...
Yet, "politics ain't beanbag," to quote the 19th century newspaperman Finley Peter Dunne. And it ain't a Bear/Packer game, either.
Does wanting peace and security, imperial wars ended? Does believing in equity and justice for everyone, not just America's privileged few?
high school students protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall Monday, Nov. 14, 2016.
Even before that, Publishers were being pressured by conservative school boards to sanitize history by substituting "Atlantic triangular trade" for the slave trade.
It seems we've forgotten that the purpose of a newspaper, as Chicago Evening Post journalist and humorist Finley Peter Dunne put it in an 1893 column, is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Could there be a better reason to give Donald J.
It seems we've forgotten that the purpose of a newspaper, as Chicago Evening Post journalist and humorist Finley Peter Dunne put it in an 1893 column, is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Could there be a better reason to give Donald J.
In April, President Barack Obama nominated William Jung - who has specialized in white-collar criminal defense and complex civil litigation in two Tampa Bay area law firms since 1993, after serving six years as an assistant U.S.
It seems we've forgotten that the purpose of a newspaper, as Chicago Evening Post journalist and humorist Finley Peter Dunne put it in an 1893 column, is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Could there be a better reason to give Donald J.
The American journalist and pundit Finley Peter Dunne wrote in the 1890s that the job of the journalist was to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.
... banks, commands th' milishy, controls th' ligislachure, baptizes th' young, marries th' foolish, comforts th' afflicted, afflicts th' comfortable, buries th' dead an' roasts thim aftherward.
Thwarted, Jefferson settled on appointing Republicans, to vacancies, but he came to regard Marshall as his principal political opponent.
"politics ain't bean-bag," Finley Peter Dunne's barkeep character Mr. Dooley said famously. It can be bruising - it will be bruising in Washington, too - and it should be humbling as candidates take their messages across Louisiana.
"politics ain't bean-bag," Finley Peter Dunne's barkeep character Mr. Dooley said famously. It can be bruising - it will be bruising in Washington, too - and it should be humbling as candidates take their messages across Louisiana.
"It is the duty of a newspaper to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable." - Finley Peter Dunne, 1902. ***.
Progressive views on law and politics. [This column was originally published by Truthdig.com]. As the Supreme Court begins its new term, an old adage comes to mind, first penned by the satirist Finley Peter Dunne in 1901. Purged of its original Irish ...
"It is the duty of a newspaper to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable." - Finley Peter Dunne, 1902. ***.
Finley Peter Dunne was a key forbear of the likes of Art Buchwald and Maureen Dowd. His "Mr. Dooley" pieces, especially, captured the thoughts of a Chicago bartender on the absurdities of the political arena at the turn of the century.
By the turn of the last century, as the American economy grew more industrialized, Americans' economic interests grew more differentiated--and hostile.
By the turn of the last century, as the American economy grew more industrialized, Americans' economic interests grew more differentiated--and hostile.
... likely to say, "It's not worth it." That will be the new credo of journalism, replacing the still-stirring words that journalist-humorist Finley Peter Dunne wrote more than 100 years ago: "The job of the newspaper is to comfort the afflicted and ...
Things are getting stranger by the day, sometimes by the hour, on the fringes of technology, and no will blame you if you can't keep up or don't want to.
Abbott stayed in Paris for a time after the 1900 Olympics and would later meet noted American Humorist Finley Peter Dunne. She and Dunne were married in 1902 and lived in New York for many years.
And there are more layers to her story: her husband was Finley Peter Dunne, a nationally prominent humorist and writer from the early 1900s - he's recognized as the person who coined this memorable description of the role of the free press: "To comfort ...


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