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 Dale Maharidge

Dale Maharidge

is Lokey Visiting Professor in Professional Journalism in the Department of Communication at Stanford University. He began his journalism career 25 years ago, working at newspapers in Ohio and California. His first job was at The Gazette in Medina, Ohio. He also worked for the Cleveland Plain Dealer as a feature writer before spending a decade at the Sacramento Bee (CA), where was a special projects reporter, focusing on social issues. His assignments took him to El Salvador, the Philippines and around the United States. Maharidge has published five books, three of them with photographer Michael Williamson. In 1990, the two shared the non-fiction Pulitzer Prize for

And Their Children After Them
. Other books include:

Journey to Nowhere: The Saga of the New Underclass
(1985);

Yosemite: A Landscape of Life
(1990);

The Last Great American Hobo
(1993). His most recent book,

The Coming White Minority: California's Multiculturalism and the Nation's Future
(1996/1999), chronicles events leading up to whites falling below half of California's population. He has won numerous journalism awards, the most recent being a 2001 Social Justice Journalism Award from Hunter College, for a George Magazine story on child hunger in America, tied to the 2000 presidential election. In 1994, the Pope Foundation gave him a $15,000 mid-career achievement grant. Maharidge has written for George Magazine, Rolling Stone, The Nation, Mother Jones, the New York Times op/ed page, others. Maharidge attended Cleveland State University majoring in English and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1987-88.



Dale Maharidge

, who won a Pulitzer for his 1989 book And Their Children After Them, about rural poverty, never found it difficult to see the world from the bottom up. Since taking his first journalism job at The Gazette of Medina in Cleveland, his hometown, in 1977, Maharidge has been referred to by editors, somewhat derisively, he says, as the bum writer. He was the son of a steelworker who had a side business at home, grinding cutting tools for industrial use. I literally grew up breathing steel dust, says Maharidge. His new book,

Homeland
, due out July 4, is about an undercurrent of working- class really working-poor anger that Maharidge says predates 9/11. The book highlights the kinds of stories the press misses because of this lens problem Shipler talks about.



Dale Maharidge, who won a Pulitzer for his 1989 book And Their Children After Them, about rural poverty, never found it difficult to see the world from the bottom up. Since taking his first journalism job at The Gazette of Medina in Cleveland, his hometown, in 1977, Maharidge has been referred to by editors, somewhat derisively, he says, as the "bum writer." He was the son of a steelworker who had a side business at home, grinding cutting tools for industrial use. "I literally grew up breathing steel dust," says Maharidge.

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A scene from Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018), directed by RaMell Ross (all images © IDIOM Film, courtesy RaMell Ross). Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018), a transcendental and immersive documentary assembled by RaMell Ross, is comprised entirely of stray shots and bits ...
"I've been road-tripping around the country, shunning interstates, since the Seventies, and I've noticed a sharp decline in the quality of our secondary roads—especially over the past ten years," author Dale Maharidge writes in the article. The reasons are numerous: from the end of the post-WWII boom, ...

In the 1980s, Dale Maharidge worked at The Sacramento Bee, winning a Pulitzer Prize along the way, and then ended up teaching at Stanford University. During his 10 years there, he'd bought land near Petrolia, site of California's first oil strike and today a quiet enclave with a pretty white steeple church.
What Happens to Journalists When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore? BY Dale Maharidge | March 4, 2016. Whatever comes next, however, The Voice's place in the history of modern journalism is secure. Long before anyone used the terms “alt-right” or “alt-left,” there was the “alt-weekly.
But last week saw the revelation of a new, as-yet untold chapter in the saga: Writing in Harper's, journalists Dale Maharidge and Jessica Bruder describe their role in the leaks. It's a gripping story, involving cell phones stashed in refrigerators, a box of sensitive material buried under an outhouse and then ...
Dale Maharidge is an award-winning journalist and professor of journalism, but was only pulled into the Snowden leak because of a Brooklyn house party he attended one night in December 2011, where he met filmmaker (and Intercept co-founder) Laura Poitras. The two bonded quickly over their work and ...

Seventy-five years ago, writer James Agee and photographer Walker Evans documented the lives of poor, rural Americans in the classic book "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men." Thirty years later, journalists Dale Maharidge (@dalemaharidge) and Michael Williamson revisited that story and produced their ...
DALE MAHARIDGE: What happened was in 1982, I started covering the recession that was then going on. It was a very severe recession, and I found out that there were these new hobos, people riding free trains, looking for work in California. So I rode the trains with them and realised a lot of them were ...
Dale Maharidge on a Californian train in 1982. (Courtesy of Dale Maharidge) (TRT World and Agencies). Five years before Donald Trump won the 2016 US presidential election, Dale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University in New York, predicted what he called the rise of "dark populism" ...
Dale Maharidge on a Californian train in 1982. (Courtesy of Dale Maharidge) (TRT World and Agencies). Five years before Donald Trump won the 2016 US presidential election, Dale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University in New York, predicted what he called the rise of "dark populism" ...
“Why don't they work in the fields?” she asked. (Matt Black / Magnum Photos). By Dale Maharidge; Photographs by Matt Black. Smithsonian Magazine | Subscribe December 2016. Just north of Sacramento is a tiny settlement that residents call La Tijera, The Scissors, because two roads come together there at a sharp angle.
Growing up in Cleveland, I lived through the events that made the city a punch line for Johnny Carson. September 22, 1969: when the Cuyahoga River caught fire. October 16, 1972: when Mayor Ralph Perk's hair caught fire, set aflame as he wielded a blowtorch at a ceremonial ribbon-cutting ceremony.
These Journalists Dedicated Their Lives to Telling Other People's Stories. What Happens When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore? These Journalists Dedicated Their Lives to Telling Other People's Stories. What Happens When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore? As newsrooms ...
Steve pretty much remained drunk for the next four years," writes his son, Pulitzer-winning journalist Dale Maharidge, in this harrowing chronicle of combat's aftermath. Following Steve's death, Dale began his 12-year quest to understand the roots of his father's drinking and rage, pursuing the surviving ...
The search for Private Mulligan started with a blood-flecked Japanese flag that Dale Maharidge, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who teaches journalism at Columbia University, found among his father's things after he died. Mr. Maharidge's father had been a Marine on Okinawa, and the flag was a souvenir ...
The search for Private Mulligan started with a blood-flecked Japanese flag that Dale Maharidge, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who teaches journalism at Columbia University, found among his father's things after he died. Mr. Maharidge's father had been a Marine on Okinawa, and the flag was a souvenir ...
“Bumpy Ride: Why America's roads are in tatters,” by Dale Maharidge in Harper's Magazine: “Roads symbolize one of the fundamental contracts between a government and its citizens. They are among the most direct and regular relationships people have with the state. If the roads are failing, it means ...

"I've been road-tripping around the country, shunning interstates, since the Seventies, and I've noticed a sharp decline in the quality of our secondary roads—especially over the past ten years," author Dale Maharidge writes in the article. The reasons are numerous: from the end of the post-WWII boom, ...
As the venerable weekly newspaper ceases print publication, let us hope that its brilliantly belligerent journalistic legacy lives on. By John ...
But last week saw the revelation of a new, as-yet untold chapter in the saga: Writing in Harper's, journalists Dale Maharidge and Jessica Bruder ...
Dale Maharidge is an award-winning journalist and professor of journalism, but was only pulled into the Snowden leak because of a Brooklyn ...
Seventy-five years ago, writer James Agee and photographer Walker Evans documented the lives of poor, rural Americans in the classic book ...
A conversation with Dale Maharidge, who has covered American poverty since the early 1980s. In "Someplace like America," he predicted that ...
By Dale Maharidge; Photographs by Matt Black. Smithsonian Magazine | Subscribe December 2016. Just north of Sacramento is a tiny settlement that residents ...
Dale MaharidgeDale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University, was a newspaperman for fifteen years. He's the author of ten ...
Dale MaharidgeDale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University, was a newspaperman for fifteen years. He's the author of ten ...
Steve pretty much remained drunk for the next four years," writes his son, Pulitzer-winning journalist Dale Maharidge, in this harrowing chronicle of combat's aftermath. Following Steve's death, Dale began his 12-year quest to understand the roots of his father's drinking and rage, pursuing the surviving ...
But last week saw the revelation of a new, as-yet untold chapter in the saga: Writing in Harper's, journalists Dale Maharidge and Jessica Bruder ...
Dale Maharidge is an award-winning journalist and professor of journalism, but was only pulled into the Snowden leak because of a Brooklyn ...
Seventy-five years ago, writer James Agee and photographer Walker Evans documented the lives of poor, rural Americans in the classic book ...
A conversation with Dale Maharidge, who has covered American poverty since the early 1980s. In “Someplace like America,” he predicted that ...
Dale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University, was also added to the list for an exchange he had with Project Veritas.
By Dale Maharidge; Photographs by Matt Black. Smithsonian Magazine | Subscribe December 2016. Just north of Sacramento is a tiny settlement that residents ...
Dale MaharidgeDale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University, was a newspaperman for fifteen years. He's the author of ten ...
Dale MaharidgeDale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University, was a newspaperman for fifteen years. He's the author of ten ...
Obama's presidential term will mercifully expire on 1/19/17. Hallelujah! He can quickly descend to his correct historical position as the second worst leader in american history beside the 28th president, Woodrow Wilson.
Chris Brown, working at the Evergreen Cooperative Laundry in Cleveland. He started out sweeping floors. Now he's a supervisor.
--"A Photographic Chronicle of America's Working Poor," by Dale Maharidge with photos by Matt Black in the December issue of Smithsonian: "Smithsonian journeyed from Maine to California to update a landmark study of American life.
Dale Maharidge, a journalism professor at Columbia University, was also added to the list for an exchange he had with Project Veritas.
When Journalism School professor Dale Maharidge saw that he had appeared on an online watchlist of leftist professors, he took to Twitter to share his reaction.
From Virginia, to Youngstown, Ohio to Lackawanna, New York - they are, as Dale Maharidge calls them - the New Timers. Workers whose jobs no longer exist that were born and raised in towns that have turned ghostly.
... "Home Sweet Home" about squatters and homeless people five years after Hurrican Katrina in New Orleans (co-produced with Pulitzer Prize winning author Dale Maharidge); and " Murals of Belfast" about the power of art in the troubles of Northern Ireland.
Growing up in Cleveland, I lived through the events that made the city a punch line for Johnny Carson. September 22, 1969: when the Cuyahoga River caught fire.
Growing up in Cleveland, I lived through the events that made the city a punch line for Johnny Carson. September 22, 1969: when the Cuyahoga River caught fire.
A more current 2016 article by Dale Maharidge of Moyers and Company, "What Happens to Journalists When No One Wants to Print Their Words Anymore?
In addition, the plight of the middle-age journalist is all too real, as Dale Maharidge pointed out last month in the Nation.
A soon-to-be-former colleague passed me Dale Maharidge's piece on the state of journalism ["Written Off," March 21].
Last month in The Nation, Dale Maharidge wrote a harrowing account of what the journalism world already knew: Today's daily newspaper industry is bleak, rife with depressed layoff victims, decimated newsrooms and survivors facing a scary future and a ...
BY Dale Maharidge | March 4, 2016. As regional daily newspapers have shuttered, as local newspapers have downsized, as local radio hosts have been replaced by syndicated "content," and as old lines of distinction between broadcast and print and digital ...
Strangely, they write far fewer about other journalists who can no longer get work. Dale Maharidge at Moyers & Co interviews ex-newshounds who are struggling to make ends meet, and their stories are as tough and sad as those of any Detroit auto-worker ...


 

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