Schema-Root.org logo

 

  cross-referenced news and research resources about

 John F. Tinker

John F. Tinker is a life-long human rights and peace activist. He is known as the first-named petitioner in the 1969 U.S. Supreme Court decision, Tinker v. Des Moines. In December of 1965, with his sister Mary Beth Tinker, their friend Christopher Eckhardt, and several others, they were suspended from schools in Des Moines, Iowa, for having worn black armbands to protest against the war in Vietnam. The Tinkers and Eckhardt successfully sued the school system in federal court, for violations of their First Amendment rights to free expression of their opinions, absent any disturbance to the educational environment.


Since the decision in their case, several other Supreme Court cases have subsequently carved out exceptions to the general principle that students and teachers do not shed their Constitutional rights when at school. These exceptions are: Hazelwood v. Kulemeir, which give schools the right to censor the student newspaper; Bethel v. Fraser, which gives school administrations the right to censor sexual innuendo; and Morse v. Frederick, which gives schools the right to censor the advocacy of illegal drug use. However, the protection of political speech which is not a "material and substantial" disruption to the educational environment, still stands.


John Tinker is also the chief engineer and station manager of low-power FM community radio station KPIP, in Fayette, Missouri, and the creator and developer of this website, Schema-Root.org.

John F. Tinker
John F. Tinker
images:  google   yahoo YouTube
spacer

updated Sun. March 31, 2019

-
In 1961, the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) organized the Freedom Rides, testing a 1960 Supreme Court decision that outlawed segregated interstate ... In 1965, siblings Mary Beth (13 years old) and John Tinker (15 years old) were suspended from school for wearing black armbands as a protest ...
Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear what is now considered a landmark decision that set a precedent for many free speech cases. In Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, the court ruled that students do not "shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or ...

Des Moines, Iowa, students Mary Beth Tinker and her brother, John display two black armbands, the objects of the U.S. Supreme Court's agreement on March 4, 1968, .... Morse) — the majority in Tinker found that armband-wearing students weren't enough of a distraction to merit the school's response.
What the New Voices Act does is restore the Tinker standard, which says even students have first amendment rights and the censor must prove the need for censorship. This came from the 1965 case of Tinker v Des Moines in which John F. Tinker and siblings wore armbands to protest the Vietnam war and ...
There's no doubt that hugely important legal principles emerged from John Tinker's decision to wear a protest armband in school and Cheryl Brown Henderson's ... Students of constitutional law parse the words and reasoning in the Supreme Court's Tinker, Brown, and Korematsu opinions in high schools, ...
Back in 1988, the Supreme Court took on a case called Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier and ... The students, John Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt, had been sent home from school for their actions. ... Des Moines (1969), we corrected it to include the third student, John Tinker.

This year, 2018, marks 30 years since the Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier decision was handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court. The SPLC is leading the call throughout the year to raise awareness about the Hazelwood decision, publicize its destructive legacy and focus on the need for New Voices legislation to ...
Des Moines: Protecting student free speech ... On December 16, 1965, Tinker wore a black armband to school to protest the war in Vietnam and to mourn the hundreds of soldiers killed in action—a number that would approach 60,000 by war's end, .... The case was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
The protest led to the landmark 7-2 decision by the Supreme Court in 1969 that upheld the students' right to protest the Vietnam War as long as school was ... In a video segment on the "Landmark Cases" episode, John Tinker, Mary Beth's brother who also wore a black armband during the protest, will lead ...
The Supreme Court of the United States handed down a landmark freedom of speech case for students on February 24, 1969. It involved two Des Moines, Iowa high school students, John Tinker, 15, and Christopher Eckhardt, 16, and John's 13-year-old sister, Mary Beth Tinker, a Des Moines junior high ...
Fact of the day:Mary Beth and John Tinker wore black armbands to school during the vietnam war to protest what they saw as an injustice. After getting suspended for peacefully protesting, their case made it to the supreme court, establishing the constitutional rights of students. pic.twitter.com/gWlXtVVgee.
That's when their at-school protest against the Vietnam War eventually led to a landmark Supreme Court decision. "Students don't shed their constitutional rights at the school house gates," states the 1969 Supreme Court decision in the case of Tinker vs. Des Moines Independent Community School District.
"Look at Supreme Court cases - Tinker v. Des Moines ... Des Moines case happened during the Vietnam War, when some kids decided to wear black arm bands to protest it and were suspended as a result. ... John Tinker was one of those students, and he visited Springfield for a lecture a few years ago.
Mary Beth and John Tinker, along with a childhood friend Chris Eckhardt, were suspended from Des Moines schools when they decided to wear black armbands in protest of the Vietnam War. On March 4, 1968, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear arguments in the case and how far public schools can ...
Des Moines, Iowa, students Mary Beth Tinker and her brother, John display two black armbands, the objects of the U.S. Supreme Court's agreement on March 4, 1968, ... Morse) — the majority in Tinker found that armband-wearing students weren't enough of a distraction to merit the school's response.
What the New Voices Act does is restore the Tinker standard, which says even students have first amendment rights and the censor must prove the need for censorship. This came from the 1965 case of Tinker v Des Moines in which John F. Tinker and siblings wore armbands to protest the Vietnam war and ...
There's no doubt that hugely important legal principles emerged from John Tinker's decision to wear a protest armband in school and Cheryl Brown Henderson's ... Students of constitutional law parse the words and reasoning in the Supreme Court's Tinker, Brown, and Korematsu opinions in high schools, ...

Back in 1988, the Supreme Court took on a case called Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier and ... The students, John Tinker, Mary Beth Tinker and Christopher Eckhardt, had been sent home from school for their actions. ... Des Moines (1969), we corrected it to include the third student, John Tinker.
This year, 2018, marks 30 years since the Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier decision was handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court. The SPLC is leading the call throughout the year to raise awareness about the Hazelwood decision, publicize its destructive legacy and focus on the need for New Voices legislation to ...
Des Moines: Protecting student free speech ... On December 16, 1965, Tinker wore a black armband to school to protest the war in Vietnam and to mourn the hundreds of soldiers killed in action—a number that would approach 60,000 by war's end, .... The case was appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
Tinker vs. Des Moines School District involved three Des Moines students who were suspended for wearing black armbands to school to protest the Vietnam War. John F. Tinker, 15, and Christopher Eckhardt, 16, were high school students. Mary Beth Tinker, John's 13-year-old sister, was in junior high.


 

news and opinion


 


 


 


 


schema-root.org

   activists
    peace
     individuals
       john tinker

peace activists:
       ann wright
       brian terrell
       christina grafer
       daniel ellsberg
       david cline
       duncan murphy
       frank cordaro
       furkan dogan
       george willoughby
       gino strada
       hedy epstein
       helen caldicott
       jackie hudson
       james loney
       james w. douglass
       jamie spector
       jeff stack
       john tinker
       judy evered
       kathy kelly
       kenneth o'keefe
       marla ruzicka
       medea benjamin
       michael berg
       norman kember
       peter demott
       rachel corrie
       scott parkin
       sherwood ross
       stan goff
       susan lindauer
       tighe barry
       tom fox
       tristan anderson