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 Stuxnet worm virus

Stuxnet is a malicious computer worm believed to be a jointly built American-Israeli cyber weapon. Although neither state has confirmed this openly, anonymous US officials speaking to The Washington Post claimed the worm was developed during the Obama administration to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program with what would seem like a long series of unfortunate accidents.


Stuxnet specifically targets programmable logic controllers (PLCs), which allow the automation of electromechanical processes such as those used to control machinery on factory assembly lines, amusement rides, or centrifuges for separating nuclear material. Exploiting four zero-day flaws, Stuxnet functions by targeting machines using the Microsoft Windows operating system and networks, then seeking out Siemens Step7 software. Stuxnet reportedly compromised Iranian PLCs, collecting information on industrial systems and causing the fast-spinning centrifuges to tear themselves apart. Stuxnet’s design and architecture are not domain-specific and it could be tailored as a platform for attacking modern SCADA and PLC systems (e.g., in automobile or power plants), the majority of which reside in Europe, Japan and the US. Stuxnet reportedly ruined almost one fifth of Iran's nuclear centrifuges.


Stuxnet has three modules: a worm that executes all routines related to the main payload of the attack; a link file that automatically executes the propagated copies of the worm; and a rootkit component responsible for hiding all malicious files and processes, preventing detection of the presence of Stuxnet.

Stuxnet virus
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Stuxnet and Dragonfly already demonstrated the destructive potential of a targeted cyber attack against infrastructure, from banks and hospitals to transportation and even energy providers. These attacks typically exploit basic gaps in cyber defences, yet have the potential to have substantial, lasting ...
The malware -- which FireEye calls Triton and Dragos calls TRISIS - is similar to the Stuxnet malware used in Iran in 2010 and Industroyer deployed in Ukraine in 2016. A recent Triton attack targeted Schneider Electric's Triconex safety system, and the malware has already had at least one victim, the ...

The first nation state-level cyber-attack on critical infrastructure, widely attributed to a joint collaboration between American and Israeli intelligence against Iran, was uncovered in 2010. Known as the Stuxnet virus, the attack aimed to take down Iran's nuclear program. The virus failed to achieve its mission.
The first nation state-level cyber-attack on critical infrastructure, widely attributed to a joint collaboration between American and Israeli intelligence against Iran, was uncovered in 2010. Known as the Stuxnet virus, the attack aimed to Take Down Iran's nuclear program. The virus failed to achieve its mission.
The Stuxnet computer worm temporarily disabled 1,000 centrifuges at the facility, prompting Iran to become a cyber threat -- including to the U.S. less ... Iranian hackers developed payback motive, too, after 2012 newspaper reports about the U.S. and Israeli "Stuxnet" malware attacks on the Iranian nuclear ...
Iran wasn't pursuing cyber capabilities with much urgency, experts say, until it was revealed in 2010 that a joint Israeli-U.S. Stuxnet worm sabotaged nuclear centrifuges at Iran's facility in Natanz. As the first-known instance of virtual intrusions resulting in physical effects, the operation demonstrated the ...

Since Stuxnet first targeted and destroyed uranium enrichment centrifuges in Iran last decade, the cybersecurity world has waited for the next step in that digital arms race: Another piece of malicious software designed specifically to enable the damage or destruction of industrial equipment. That rare type of ...
Stuxnet demonstrated that cybersecurity breaches can cause physical damages. What if those damages had biological consequences? Could bioterrorists target government laboratories studying infectious diseases? What about pharmaceutical companies producing lifesaving drugs? As life scientists ...
Stuxnet's power is based on its ability to capitalize on software vulnerabilities in the form of a "zero day exploit." The virus infects a system silently, without requiring the user to do anything, like unwittingly download a malicious file, in order for the worm to take effect. And it didn't just run rampant through ...
Stuxnet demonstrated that cybersecurity breaches can cause physical damages. What if those damages had biological consequences? Could bioterrorists target government laboratories studying infectious diseases? What about pharmaceutical companies producing lifesaving drugs? As life scientists ...
One of the breakthroughs of the Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program was its use of legitimate digital certificates, which cryptographically vouched for the trustworthiness of the software's publisher. Following its discovery in 2010, researchers went on to find the technique was used in a handful ...
Stuxnet is an extremely sophisticated computer worm that exploits multiple previously unknown Windows zero-day vulnerabilities to infect computers and spread. Its purpose was not just to infect PCs but to cause real-world physical effects. Specifically, it targets centrifuges used to produce the enriched ...
It has been almost seven years since Stuxnet first made headlines for its devastating attack on Iranian uranium enrichment centrifuges. The years haven't made it less relevant though--it's still an important topic due to the fact the exploit Stuxnet took advantage of still ranked among the most widely used in ...
A federal court has unsealed new details about how investigators tried to track down suspected sources for New York Times reporter David Sanger's book discussing how the U.S. and Israel used a computer virus known as "Stuxnet" to sabotage Iran's nuclear program. Documents made public Thursday on ...
The Stuxnet computer worm temporarily disabled 1,000 centrifuges at the facility, prompting Iran to become a cyber threat -- including to the U.S. less ... Iranian hackers developed payback motive, too, after 2012 newspaper reports about the U.S. and Israeli "Stuxnet" malware attacks on the Iranian nuclear ...
Anyone who has worked in the InfoSec community is well acquainted with the various nation-state sponsored cyberattacks in the Middle East and North Africa region (Mena) region. Most notable of these would be the Stuxnet attack, which went after Iranian nuclear facilities and endangered numerous lives ...
It is not unheard of for western states to carry out cyber-attacks - it has been widely alleged, though never confirmed, that the U.S., with possible assistance from Israel, worked to disable Iranian nuclear centrifuges through a virus called Stuxnet. Though these discussions are taking place within NATO, the ...

The US' NSA and CIA,with assistance from Israel's Unit 8200, is strongly thought to have been responsible for Stuxnet, the first known case of a cyber attack destroying physical infrastructure. Both nations have yet to confirm their involvement in the destruction of Iranian centrifuges at the Natanz nuclear ...
The campaign against the Russian cybersecurity firm goes back to 2010, when Kaspersky Lab revealed the origin of the Stuxnet virus, Machon told RT. Back then, Kaspersky Labs stated that "this type of attack could only be conducted with nation-state support and backing." Nobody officially claimed ...
Using the Stuxnet virus, which took an Iranian uranium facility offline, Ben-Israel noted that real physical effects -- in this case the collapse of the centrifuge machines -- can result from "virtual" information such as the computer virus. This led him to propose four false dogmas relating to cyber warfare.
One of the breakthroughs of the Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program was its use of legitimate digital certificates, which cryptographically vouched for the trustworthiness of the software's publisher. Following its discovery in 2010, researchers went on to find the technique was used in a handful ...
It was made public by the New York Times in a June 2012 article that, by the joint work of the US and Israeli computer scientists, a new secret and special computer virus named "Stuxnet v.0.5" was produced in 2007. In 2009, with the permission of the president of the United States, the virus was infiltrated ...
In an article entitled "The Stuxnet Attack On Iran's nuclear Plant Was 'Far More Dangerous' Than Previously Thought," Business Insider author Michael B. Kelly explains the virus's effect on the "Natanz Enrichment Complex," Iran's primary nuclear enrichment facility: "Stuxnet, a joint U.S.-Israel project, ...
Stuxnet was the first known attack that allowed hackers to manipulate physical objects in the real-world. The Stuxnet worm, which targets ...
EU Automation explains how manufacturers can use programmable logic controllers and still reduce the risks of cyberattacks like Stuxnet, one ...
Israeli security has had a tense relationship with Kaspersky Lab since the company's research on Stuxnet, a specialised piece of malware ...
More specifically, it seems to be decompiled code for the infamous Stuxnet virus (thanks, aaron44126!), which is a particularly strange thing for ...
Stuxnet was credited for successfully taking down the centrifuges ... He continued: 'Stuxnet 2.0 was designed to work with the same type of ...
A Windows Shell flaw used by the Stuxnet worm continues to pose problems years after it was patched. Nick Lewis explains how the flaw ...
Stuxnet is an extremely sophisticated computer worm that exploits multiple previously unknown Windows zero-day vulnerabilities to infect computers and spread. Its purpose was not just to infect PCs but to cause real-world physical effects. Specifically, it targets centrifuges used to produce the enriched ...
Stuxnet was one of the most advanced malware attacks in history. ... TechRepublic's smart person's guide about Stuxnet is a quick introduction ...
Similarly, cyberweapons like Stuxnet were most likely originally developed as tools of defense to limit Iran's nuclear proliferation abilities, but ...
... by delivering advanced capabilities into the hands of governments and others that can end up in the wrong hands--i.e., the Stuxnet effect.
... Interview", a satirical film about the country's leader, and the American-Israeli Stuxnet software-driven sabotage of Iran's nuclear centrifuges.
Prior to the Stuxnet attack, very few outside the engineering profession had heard of a programmable logic controller (PLC),let alone what its ...
The best-known offensive cyber operation remains the Stuxnet attack on Iran's nuclear facility at Natanz in 2009. The attack was clever and ...
Stuxnet is an extremely sophisticated computer worm that exploits multiple previously unknown Windows zero-day vulnerabilities to infect ...
Een aantal jaar geleden was de computerworm Stuxnet veelvuldig in het nieuws. De malware richtte zich in 2010 onder meer op het nucleaire ...
Stuxnet was one of the most advanced malware attacks in history. ... TechRepublic's smart person's guide about Stuxnet is a quick introduction ...
The Iranian nuclear program was famously hindered around 2010 by malware known as Stuxnet, widely believed to be developed by U.S. and ...
Take the example of the Stuxnet worm, a 500-kilobyte computer worm that infiltrated numerous computer systems used in Iranian nuclear ...
Dayton, Ohio - Cyber hackers bent on chaos could potentially attack water treatment and chemical plants, power grids, financial institutions and disable weapon systems, and have stolen personal data of millions of federal employees and consumers.
DAYTON >> Cyber hackers bent on chaos could potentially attack water treatment and chemical plants, power grids, financial institutions and disable weapon systems, and have stolen personal data of millions of federal employees and consumers.
The U.S. government learned a lesson about that when it created the Stuxnet computer worm to destroy Iran's nuclear program.
However, focused cyberattacks such as Stuxnet or Aurora that can push a system into known dangerous states are not commonly expected in the normal operation of ICSs.
The New York Times has reported a joint U.S.-Israeli effort under prior administrations to launch the Stuxnet worm virus into a nuclear processing plant in Iran out of concerns that country was developing an atomic weapon.
For example the Stuxnet worm via USB". There is a very plausible explanation why some airline passengers have been banned from taking laptops into the cabins of aircraft.
"We saw with Stuxnet that this kind of thing can be easily tapped," Green says, and the same sort of attack could be aimed at American infrastructure.
The New York Times has reported a joint U.S.-Israeli effort under prior administrations to launch the Stuxnet worm virus into a nuclear processing plant in Iran out of concerns that country was developing an atomic weapon.
As "Zero Days" premieres in the US, The Cybersecurity Podcast team talks with Gibney about the making of the film, the often frustrating secrecy of official Washington, and his surprise when he found out that Stuxnet was just a small part of a much ...


 

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