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 John DiIulio

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John Dilulio
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In 1995, a Princeton political scientist named John DiIulio Jr. coined the term "superpredators" to describe a new breed of young urban criminal, born to crack-addicted mothers and absent fathers, that was rising to terrorize America.
Period. John DiIulio Jr., a former aide to President George W. Bush and currently a professor of politics, religion and civil society at the University of Pennsylvania, is the man who coined the term "superpredator" in 1995.

Twenty years ago, in a speech at Keene State College in New Hampshire, then-First Lady Hillary Clinton made a comment about juvenile crime that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump called her out on in Monday's debate.
The RFP will host Brian Grim, along with Byron Johnson of Baylor University's Institute for Studies of religion and John DiIulio of the University of Pennsylvania, to discuss and debate the merits as well as limitations of this study. They will also ...
The term was coined by John DiIulio Jr, a professor at Princeton University. DiIulio interpreted rising juvenile crime statistics to mean that a "new breed" of juvenile offender had been born, one who was "stone cold," "fatherless, Godless, and jobless ...
It played into the concept of "super predator" teens pushed by criminologist John DiIulio. DiIulio made a presentation to President Clinton in 1995 that predicted a coming wave of these teens who killed or maimed on impulse, with no motive.

Corey's thinking seems to be stuck in the era of the so-called "superpredator," a term popularized in the 1990s by political scientist John DiIulio to describe juvenile criminals with no hope of rehabilitation. DiIulio's theory has since been wholly ...
He is the author of The partisan Sort (University of Chicago Press, 2009), How Partisan Media Polarize American (University of Chicago Press, 2013), and the co-author (with James Q. Wilson, John DiIulio, and Meena Bose) of American government: ...
The practice of sentencing children to life without parole stems from the 1990s when the term "superpredator" was coined by political scientist John DiIulio. Superpredators were understood as young people who repeatedly committed violent crimes as a ...
That was the era of the "superpredator" (a term that has recently resurfaced in the presidential contest), a term coined by John DiIulio, a Princeton professor who later became the director of Faith-Based Initiatives in George W. Bush's administration ...
In July 2015, Gove was photographed leaving hospital after injuring his foot with a with a copy of right wing American academic John DiIulio's book Governing Prisons (published during the American carceral boom of the 1980s) under his arm. Diullio ...
The theory, predicted by political scientist John DiIulio Jr., has since been disproved. "The super-predator theory was always bulls**t," says criminal justice researcher Franklin Zimring of the University of California, Berkeley, in an interview with ...
The theory, predicted by political scientist John DiIulio Jr., has since been disproved. "The super-predator theory was always bulls**t," says criminal justice researcher Franklin Zimring of the University of California, Berkeley, in an interview with ...
... were "super-predators," a myth since exposed and which was created by the Princeton political science professor John DiIulio (who later became George W. Bush's first director of the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives) based on junk ...
In context, "indefensible" was apparently in reference to '90s-era rhetoric about "superpredators" - a word coined by political scientist John DiIulio to describe a coming wave of remorseless and brutal youngsters who would soon wreak havoc on American ...
Even John DiIulio, the University of Pennsylvania sociologist credited with - or blamed for - inventing the term, told me in a 1998 interview that he regretted coming up with the word.
There are currently more than 19,000 registered sex offenders in Pennsylvania; more than 1,500 are classified as sexually violent predators and nearly 12,500 will remain on the registry for life.
the Bush administration also added the White House Office of Faith-based and Community Initiatives, which was first run by the brilliant and visionary University of Pennsylvania Prof.
... of the Institute for Educational Initiatives, founder of the Alliance for Catholic education, and Trustee and Fellow of the University of Notre Dame.
In 1995, John DiIulio, a professor at Princeton who coined the term "superpredator," predicted that the number of juveniles in custody would increase three-fold in the coming years and that, by 2010, there would be "an estimated 270,000 more young ...
political science professor and Philadelphia native John DiIulio agreed that - while Penn undoubtedly has a strong economic effect on the city - it receives far more benefits as a nonprofit than it lets on.
In 1995, the criminologist and political scientist John DiIulio was invited to the White House to attend a working dinner on juvenile crime.
Professor John DiIulio, a Princeton political science professor, first mentioned the word in November 1995 in an article he published in The Weekly Standard.
The phrase was introduced by Rupert Murdoch's neoconservative opinion magazine, the Weekly Standard, in a piece (11/27/95) by right-wing criminologist John DiIulio. What's striking, rereading DiIulio's article today, is how feeble its argument is. He ...
The super-predator theory, most ardently championed in the mid-1990s by political scientist John DiIulio Jr. of the University of Pennsylvania, hinged on the 99% increase in youth homicides between 1980 and 1994.
Coined by Princeton University political scientist John DiIulio Jr., the term "superpredator" was a popular description in the mid 1990s for a kind of remorseless and violent young criminal that many predicted would soon overwhelm the country.
Shortly after Bratton's star turn, political scientist John DiIulio warned that the echo of the baby boom would soon produce a demographic bulge of millions of young males that he famously dubbed "juvenile super-predators.
Shortly after Bratton's star turn, political scientist John DiIulio warned that the echo of the baby boom would soon produce a demographic bulge of millions of young males that he famously dubbed "juvenile super-predators.
Princeton Professor John DiIulio suggested in 1995 that there would be up to 270,000 "young predators" in the street by 2010, and criminologist James Alan Fox famously warned law enforcement, "Unless we act today, we're going to have a bloodbath when ...
... American teenagers pillaging America's cities and towns - "a paradigm shattering wave of ultraviolent, morally vacuous young people some call 'the superpredators'," as William Bennett, the former secretary of education, and John DiIulio, a ...
This is the brainchild of the visionary Penn political science Professor John DiIulio, who was the first to launch the White House Office of Faith-based and Community Initiatives.
The real problem, as Professor John DiIulio of Pennsylvania university has pointed out, is that most of the work of government has been outsourced to contractors who face none of the transparency requirements of the government itself.
Professor John DiIulio of Princeton University, along with a few like-minded colleagues, predicted the rise of a new class of criminal, the juvenile super-predator.
Elsewhere, political scientist John DiIulio argues in Bring Back the Bureaucrats (2014) that public administration is in crisis because Congress demands too much of it and yet doesn't provide it with nearly enough resources to do its job properly.
The term came from Princeton political scientist, John DiIulio, and was recently revisited in a New York Times Retro Report video and story, "When Youth Violence Spurred 'Superpredator' Fear," of April 6, 2014, by Clyde Haberman.
The term came from Princeton political scientist, John DiIulio, and was recently revisited in a New York Times Retro Report video and story, "When Youth Violence Spurred 'Superpredator' Fear," of April 6, 2014, by Clyde Haberman.
In recent years, John DiIulio Jr., a political science professor at the University of Pennsylvania, has focused on the increase in federal grant awards to nonprofit organizations.
In recent years, John DiIulio Jr., a political science professor at the University of Pennsylvania, has focused on the increase in federal grant awards to nonprofit organizations.
Many experts who argued decades ago that harsher treatment of juveniles at a time of a crime epidemic, have since changed their stance.
These were the years when headline-seeking criminologists like John DiIulio of Princeton and Northeastern's James Alan Fox painted lurid scenarios of "superpredators", meaning urban youth of color, swelling Generation Y by as much as 24 per cent.
1995: Princeton University political science professor John DiIulio warns of the impending rise of the juvenile "superpredator.
Those fears were stoked by warnings from analysts like Princeton University political science professor John DiIulio, who issued an alarming forecast in 1995 about the impending rise of the youth "superpredator.
Professors have also developed innovative ways to make assigning their publications both affordable and fair - political science professor John DiIulio, who assigns a text he co-authored in "Introduction to American politics," donates all royalties ...
Former Princeton professor and Bush administration official John DiIulio, the Body Count co-author who coined the term, admitted to The New York Times in 2001 that his theory of sharply rising juvenile violence had been wrong.
Professors have also developed innovative ways to make assigning their publications both affordable and fair - political science professor John DiIulio, who assigns a text he co-authored in "Introduction to American politics," donates all royalties ...
Former Princeton professor and Bush administration official John DiIulio, the Body Count co-author who coined the term, admitted to The New York Times in 2001 that his theory of sharply rising juvenile violence had been wrong.
As the University of Pennsylvania political scientist John DiIulio has noted, the number of federal bureaucrats declined about 10 percent between 1984 and 2012.
A couple of academics added fuel to the fire, especially Princeton's John DiIulio, who crunched some demographic numbers and promised that juvenile crime would skyrocket in the ensuing years.
This argument, while intense and consequential, has often lacked one element: actual knowledge about the size and role of the federal government.


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