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 Mohammad Sadeq Al-Sadr

Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr was a prominent, moderate Iraqi Shiite cleric. In his position as a widely-respected leader of the Shiite minority in Iraq, he publicly called for government reforms and release of detained Shiite leaders.



He was killed under mysterious circumstances in the Iraqi city of



al-Najaf
on February 19, 1999. Popular opinion among Shiites in Iraq, as well as many international observers, holds that the Iraqi government was implicated if not directly responsible.



Following the fall of Baghdad, the majority-Shiite suburb of Saddam City was unofficially but popularly renamed to Sadr City in his honor.

Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr

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updated Mon. May 31, 2021

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Two advantages distinguish al-Sadr from his rivals: the legacy of his father, Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, and the mobilizing capacity of the Sadrist movement. These factors may enable him to forestall Iran's creeping domination of Iraq and propel Iraq's political class toward reform. While his ...
... Peace, is probably the most highly desired final resting place of many Shia Muslims around the word. Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, father of firebrand cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr, and who formerly served as Grand Ayatollah before his assaination, is but one of the high-ranking clerics buried here.

He has strong opposition credentials: When Moqtada Sadr's father, the Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, was assassinated in Najaf in 1999, his followers in Sadr City rioted in a rare and dangerous show against Saddam Hussein. The latest Sadr has taken up the family mantle of ...
Sadr is also following the line of his soft-spoken but passionately patriotic father, Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, who was murdered by agents of Saddam Hussein in 1999. Read more ▻. Trump, here's a solution for Iraq after the defeat of IS. Muqtada al-Sadr's overtures to Sunnis are having a ...
They were mobilised and given an outlet for their grievances by the Sadrist movement, established by the charismatic Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, whose son Muqtada now leads the movement. The making of these militias is the disorder of the post-2003 political order. The collapse of the state ...
Among the most-visited graves are those of Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, killed in an ambush in 1999, whose son Moqtada al-Sadr would in 2004 seize the Imam Ali shrine in defiance of the US occupation authorities. Despite the huge expanse of the graveyard, there are now ...

Sadr has become the voice of Iraq's Shia underclass and has continued the legacy of his father, Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr. The senior Sadr established a significant following and social base during the 1990s, when Iraq's destitute Shia population suffered both from the repression of the Baath regime and ...
The two bombs were detonated in a mobile phone market in Sadr City, a primarily Shia district in the suburbs of the Iraqi capital. According to Iraqi police, the men arrived in the crowded market on motorcycles before detonating their suicide bombs. Shi'ite areas of Baghdad have long been targeted by Isis, ...
Two advantages distinguish al-Sadr from his rivals: the legacy of his father, Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, and the mobilizing capacity of the Sadrist movement. These factors may enable him to forestall Iran's creeping domination of Iraq and propel Iraq's political class toward reform. While his ...
... Peace, is probably the most highly desired final resting place of many Shia Muslims around the word. Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, father of firebrand cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr, and who formerly served as Grand Ayatollah before his assaination, is but one of the high-ranking clerics buried here.
He has strong opposition credentials: When Moqtada Sadr's father, the Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, was assassinated in Najaf in 1999, his followers in Sadr City rioted in a rare and dangerous show against Saddam Hussein. The latest Sadr has taken up the family mantle of ...
Sadr is also following the line of his soft-spoken but passionately patriotic father, Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, who was murdered by agents of Saddam Hussein in 1999. Read more ▻. Trump, here's a solution for Iraq after the defeat of IS. Muqtada al-Sadr's overtures to Sunnis are having a ...
They were mobilised and given an outlet for their grievances by the Sadrist movement, established by the charismatic Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, whose son Muqtada now leads the movement. The making of these militias is the disorder of the post-2003 political order. The collapse of the state ...
Among the most-visited graves are those of Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, killed in an ambush in 1999, whose son Moqtada al-Sadr would in 2004 seize the Imam Ali shrine in defiance of the US occupation authorities. Despite the huge expanse of the graveyard, there are now ...
Sadr has become the voice of Iraq's Shia underclass and has continued the legacy of his father, Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr. The senior Sadr established a significant following and social base during the 1990s, when Iraq's destitute Shia population suffered both from the repression of the Baath regime and ...
The two bombs were detonated in a mobile phone market in Sadr City, a primarily Shia district in the suburbs of the Iraqi capital. According to Iraqi police, the men arrived in the crowded market on motorcycles before detonating their suicide bombs. Shi'ite areas of Baghdad have long been targeted by Isis, ...
Observers believe that the fatwa targets Sadrist Movement supporters because it is customary for the Sadrists to follow Haeri, according to the the will of late Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr. Haeri issued a loyalist fatwa in 2010 which forced Muqtada al-Sadr to support Prime Minister Nouri ...

... 1980-88 war and decamped to Tehran, al- Sadr's father, Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, stayed home and was assassinated in 1999.
Two advantages distinguish al-Sadr from his rivals: the legacy of his father, Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, and the mobilizing ...
Would the visit of the Shia cleric, a member of an influential Shia family and son of the prominent Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, help ...
Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, father of firebrand cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr, and who formerly served as Grand Ayatollah before his ...
He has strong opposition credentials: When Moqtada Sadr's father, the Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, was ...
We are all Iraqis." Sadr is also following the line of his soft-spoken but passionately patriotic father, Grand Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, ...
... the Sadrist movement, established by the charismatic Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, whose son Muqtada now leads the movement.
Like my reference and leader [Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, Muqtada al-Sadr's father], I was created to serve as a burning candle. So may the ...
Like my reference and leader [Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, Muqtada al-Sadr's father], I was created to serve as a burning candle. So may the ...
... because it is customary for the Sadrists to follow Haeri, according to the the will of late Ayatollah Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr.
They were mobilised and given an outlet for their grievances by the Sadrist movement, established by the charismatic Ayatollah Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, whose son Muqtada now leads the movement. The making of these militias is the disorder of the ...
Like my reference and leader [Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, Muqtada al-Sadr's father], I was created to serve as a burning candle.
The two bombs were detonated in a mobile phone market in Sadr City, a primarily Shia district in the suburbs of the Iraqi capital.
The political views and values of these mostly young, destitute Iraqi Shias were shaped considerably by the charismatic Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr, the founder of the nationalist Sadrist movement (from which Asaib al-Haq and other Shia militia ...
Sadr City is named for radical Shiite cleric Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr and is a well-known Shiite stronghold, which further suggests the possible involvement in the kidnapping of an Iran-backed Shiite militia.
Sadr City is named for radical Shiite cleric Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr and is a well-known Shiite stronghold, which further suggests the possible involvement in the kidnapping of an Iran-backed Shiite militia.


 

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schema-root.org

   iraq
    religion
     shiite
      clerics
        mohammad sadeq al‑sadr

Iraqi Shiite clerics:
        abdel aziz al‑hakim
        abdel majid al‑khoei
        mohammad sadeq al‑sadr
        muqtadah al‑sadr
        mustafa yacoubi