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 former FBI director William Steele Sessions

William Steele Sessions (b. May 27, 1930 in Fort Smith, Arkansas) is a civil servant who served as a judge and director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Sessions served as FBI director from 1987 to 1993, when he was fired by President Clinton.



In 1987 Sessions was nominated to succeed William H. Webster as FBI Director by President Ronald Reagan and was sworn in November 2, 1987.



Sessions was applauded for pursuing a policy of broadening the FBI to include more women and minorities. He was viewed as combining tough direction with fairness and was respected even by the Reagan administrations critics, although he was sometimes ridiculed as strait-laced and dull.



Sessions became associated with the phrase "Winners Don't Use Drugs", which appeared on idle arcade game screens during demos or after a player finished playing a game. By law it had to be included on all imported arcade games and continued to appear long after Sessions left office. The quote normally appeared in gold against a blue background between the FBI seal and Sessions' name.



Sessions was FBI director during the controversial 1992 confrontation at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, at which the unarmed Vicky Weaver was shot dead by an FBI sniper. This incident provoked heavy criticism of the Bureau as did the deadly assault on the Branch Davidian church February 28, 1993. These incidents were also related to the discovery of severe procedural shortcomings at the FBI's crime laboratory.



Following the inauguration of William J. Clinton as the 42nd president of the United States on January 20, 1993, allegations of ethical improprieties were made against Sessions. A report presented to the Justice Department that month by the Office of Professional Responsibility included criticisms that he had used an FBI plane to travel to visit his daughter on several occasions and had had a security system installed in his home at government expense. Janet Reno, the 78th Attorney General of the United States, announced that Sessions had exhibited "serious deficiencies in judgment." Although Sessions denied that he had acted improperly, he was pressured to resign in early July and when he refused to do so he was fired on July 19.



Clinton nominated Louis Freeh to the FBI directorship at a Rose garden ceremony on July 20. Former Deputy Director Floyd I. Clarke served as Acting Director until September 1, 1993 when Freeh was sworn in.



The ethical complaints against Sessions were widely criticized as politically motivated and he was cleared of any actual wrongdoing. He returned to Texas where on December 7, 1999 he was named the state chair of Texas Exile, a statewide initiative aimed at reducing gun crime.



Judge Sessions is a member of the American Bar Association and has served as an officer or on the Board of Directors of the Federal Bar Association of San Antonio, the American Judicature Society, the San Antonio Bar Association, the Waco-McLennan County Bar Association, and the District judges' Association of the Fifth Circuit. He was appointed by President Reagan as a Commissioner of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday Commission, and was a Delegate for The Americas to the Executive Committee of ICPO-Interpol. He is also a member of the Constitution Project's bipartisan Liberty and Security Committee.



In 2006, Mr. Sessions also was present on the American Bar Association task force examining the constitutionality of controversial presidential signing statements, which concluded that the practice "does grave harm to the separation of powers doctrine, and the system of checks and balances that have sustained our democracy for more than two centuries".


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BT_20170517_HMRUSS_2889315.jpg. Mr Trump's firing last week of FBI Director James Comey was not the first time a US president has done so.
Later came William Sessions, a former federal judge who took the job under President Ronald Reagan in 1987 and focused on white-collar crimes.

This morning, Senate Majority Leader Mitch Mcconnell said that he had spoken to President Trump regarding James Comey's replacement for the FBI director and recommended Merrick Garland. McConnell isn't the first person to suggest the idea. Republican ...
Even Republican senators get it. Appearing on "Meet the Press" on Sunday, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham downplayed Cornyn's chances, saying that "under normal circumstances [he] would be a superb choice to be FBI director. But these are not ...
U.S. News points out that, while there are similarities between Comey's firing and Sessions', both men had to deal with criticism from both sides of the political aisle, and there were reports of dissent within the rank and file of the FBI in both ...
J. Edgar Hoover, founder and first director of the FBI, served as head of that agency for 48 years before he died in his sleep in 1972.

This week President Trump fired the director of the FBI. That has happened only once before, during the Clinton administration.
"The stated reasoning for the firing is the FBI Director had mishandled the investigation into Hillary Clinton... and yet we know because the President has been repeatedly on record as applauding the FBI director for reopening that investigation," Prof ...
William Sessions is not related to current Attorney General Jeff Sessions, though he is the father of Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas.
"On facebook, Republicans shared the 1993 C-Span footage of Bill Clinton's announcement that he had fired William S. Sessions, the only other F.B.I. director to be dismissed ... [H]e had abused his federally funded travel privileges." "Erick Erickson ...
In July 1993, when then-President Bill Clinton ousted then-FBI director William Sessions, 44 percent approved vs. 24 percent who disapproved.
In this Q&A with Stanford Lawyer, Law school Professor PAMELA KARLAN discusses the legal implications of the May 9 firing of FBI Director James Comey. President Trump's firing of FBI director James Comey seems to have been a break with tradition.
More Americans disapprove of President Trump's firing former FBI Director James Comey than approve of the decision, according to a new Gallup poll released today.
The news Thursday that Kelly Ayotte, the former New Hampshire senator, was being considered by Donald Trump to be FBI director met with nods across official Washington, where people tend to like former bold-face names for bold-face jobs.
Before this week, only one FBI Director has ever been fired. That was 24 years ago when President Bill Clinton, at the recommendation of then-Attorney General Janet Reno, dismissed William Sessions after he refused to voluntarily step down amid ethical ...
Legal experts are correct when they say that Comey is the first FBI director fired in such suspicious circumstances. That's because the only other fired FBI chief, William Sessions, was ousted in 1993 by President Clinton over his unethical use of ...
Was the suspicious death of Vince Foster and the firing of Republican FBI director William S. Sessions firing a coincidence?

In the wake of President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, Senate Majority Leader Mitch Mcconnell says a Special Prosecutor is not needed to investigate Russia's interference in last year's presidential election.
He did so after the Department of Justice produced a 161-page internal report with sworn testimony from more than 100 FBI agents citing the numerous and severe ethical failures of its director, William Sessions. Clinton called Sessions twice the day he ...
"We don't know how much substance there is to the administration's claims he isn't able to run the FBI in the manner it should be run.
... was the first US president to dismiss the head of the bureau, and he made the move after the Department of Justice produced a 161-page internal report with sworn testimony from more than 100 FBI agents citing the numerous and severe ethical ...
William Sessions, center, director of the FBI, before he was fired by President Bill Clinton, during a congressional hearing on March 9, 1993.
James Comey's abrupt firing as FBI Director took Washington -- and the nation -- by surprise Tuesday, but he is not the first bureau chief to be dismissed by a president.
Trump will now appoint a successor at the FBI, which has been investigating since late July, and who will almost certainly have an impact on how the investigation moves forward and whether the public will accept its outcome.
WASHINGTON >> In the days before his firing by President Donald Trump, FBI Director James Comey told U.S. lawmakers he had asked the Justice Department for more resources to pursue the bureau's investigation into Russia's interference in last year's ...
F.B.I. directors generally serve 10-year terms, but President Bill Clinton fired William S. Sessions in 1993 because of ethical lapses.
FBI Director James Comey announces in May that the bureau will open an investigation into Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server for both her personal and government correspondence while secretary of state ...
Nearly a quarter-century ago, President Bill Clinton fired FBI director William Sessions. It was July 19, 1993, and Clinton was the first President to sack an official from that post.
You have to go all the way back to 1993 to find the last - and only other - time a president (William J. Clinton) decided to dismiss his FBI chief (William S. Sessions). And the latter, unlike Comey, was accused of a long list of bizarre ethics ...
Meskipun seorang Presiden AS memiliki wewenang untuk memecat Direktur FBI untuk alasan apapun, Comey merupakan direktur kedua yang dipecat dalam sejarah FBI. Tahun 1993, Presiden Bill Clinton memecat William S Sessions sebagai Direktur FBI.
President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions amid allegations of ethical lapses in 1993. Comey was speaking to agents at the FBI's field office in Los Angeles when the news of his firing flashed on TV screens, according to a law enforcement ...
President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions amid allegations of ethical lapses in 1993. Comey, who was in Los Angeles to speak at an FBI recruiting event, boarded his plane and headed back to Washington instead. Democrats slammed Trump's action, ...
President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions amid allegations of ethical lapses in 1993. Comey was speaking to agents at the FBI's field office in Los Angeles when the news of his firing flashed on TV screens, according to a law enforcement ...
This is only the second firing of an FBI director in history. President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions amid allegations of ethical lapses in 1993.
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey Tuesday, dramatically ousting the nation's top law enforcement official in the midst of an FBI investigation into whether Trump's campaign had ties to Russia's meddling ...
"Today, President Donald J. Trump informed FBI Director James Comey that he has been terminated and removed from office.
President Donald Trump abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey Tuesday, dramatically ousting the nation's top law enforcement official in the midst of an FBI investigation into whether Trump's campaign had ties to Russia's meddling in the election that ...
According to The Daily Kos, a liberal site, "When Bill Clinton took office in January, 1993, his FBI director was William S. Sessions, serving an appointment made by Ronald Reagan at the time of the Iran-Contra affair. Making it clear that the new ...
"Today, President Donald J. Trump informed FBI Director James Comey that he has been terminated and removed from office.
In 1993, then-President Bill Clinton removed FBI Director William Sessions from office after he refused to step down in the wake of an ethics investigation.
"The Justice Department report found, among other things, that Sessions had engaged in a sham transaction to avoid paying taxes on his use of an FBI limousine to take him to and from work, that he had billed the government for a security fence around ...
It's been 24 years since a president fired the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1993, President Clinton ousted William Sessions as FBI director after Sessions refused to voluntarily step down amid ethical concerns. It was the first ...
President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey on Tuesday, a shocking dismissal that removes the top federal law-enforcement official overseeing the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.
"Today, President Donald J. Trump informed FBI Director James Comey that he has been terminated and removed from office," White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said in a statement.
President Donald Trump abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey Tuesday, dramatically ousting the nation's top law enforcement official in the midst of an FBI investigation into whether Trump's campaign had ties to Russia's meddling in the election that ...
The only other time it happened before President Donald Trump fired James Comey Tuesday was in 1993. The then-FBI director William Sessions was facing ethics complaints that led to his dismissal about halfway through what's designed as a 10-year term.
In its 109-year history, only one F.B.I. director had been fired - until Tuesday, when President Trump fired James B. Comey.
"The Justice Department report found, among other things, that Sessions had engaged in a sham transaction to avoid paying taxes on his use of an FBI limousine to take him to and from work, that he had billed the government for a security fence around ...
President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions amid allegations of ethical lapses in 1993. Comey, who was in Los Angeles to speak at an FBI recruiting event, boarded his plane and headed back to Washington instead. Democrats slammed Trump's action, ...
Probably not, since he didn't supply the same karate chop to Donald Trump when he could have by revealing the FBI was at the same time investigating Trump's campaign for ties to Russia.


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