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 former FBI director William Steele Sessions

William Steele Sessions (b. May 27, 1930 in Fort Smith, Arkansas) is a civil servant who served as a judge and director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Sessions served as FBI Director from 1987 to 1993, when he was fired by President Clinton.



In 1987 Sessions was nominated to succeed William H. Webster as FBI director by President Ronald Reagan and was sworn in November 2, 1987.



Sessions was applauded for pursuing a policy of broadening the FBI to include more women and minorities. He was viewed as combining tough direction with fairness and was respected even by the Reagan administrationís critics, although he was sometimes ridiculed as strait-laced and dull.



Sessions became associated with the phrase "Winners Don't Use Drugs", which appeared on idle arcade game screens during demos or after a player finished playing a game. By law it had to be included on all imported arcade games and continued to appear long after Sessions left office. The quote normally appeared in gold against a blue background between the FBI seal and Sessions' name.



Sessions was FBI director during the controversial 1992 confrontation at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, at which the unarmed Vicky Weaver was shot dead by an FBI sniper. This incident provoked heavy criticism of the Bureau as did the deadly assault on the Branch Davidian church February 28, 1993. These incidents were also related to the discovery of severe procedural shortcomings at the FBI's crime laboratory.



Following the inauguration of William J. Clinton as the 42nd president of the United States on January 20, 1993, allegations of ethical improprieties were made against Sessions. A report presented to the Justice Department that month by the Office of Professional Responsibility included criticisms that he had used an FBI plane to travel to visit his daughter on several occasions and had had a security system installed in his home at government expense. Janet Reno, the 78th Attorney General of the United States, announced that Sessions had exhibited "serious deficiencies in judgment." Although Sessions denied that he had acted improperly, he was pressured to resign in early July and when he refused to do so he was fired on July 19.



Clinton nominated Louis Freeh to the FBI directorship at a Rose garden ceremony on July 20. Former Deputy Director Floyd I. Clarke served as Acting Director until September 1, 1993 when Freeh was sworn in.



The ethical complaints against Sessions were widely criticized as politically motivated and he was cleared of any actual wrongdoing. He returned to Texas where on December 7, 1999 he was named the state chair of Texas Exile, a statewide initiative aimed at reducing gun crime.



Judge Sessions is a member of the American Bar Association and has served as an officer or on the Board of Directors of the Federal Bar Association of San Antonio, the American Judicature Society, the San Antonio Bar Association, the Waco-McLennan County Bar Association, and the District judges' Association of the Fifth Circuit. He was appointed by President Reagan as a Commissioner of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday Commission, and was a Delegate for The Americas to the Executive Committee of ICPO-Interpol. He is also a member of the Constitution Project's bipartisan Liberty and Security Committee.



In 2006, Mr. Sessions also was present on the American Bar Association task force examining the constitutionality of controversial presidential signing statements, which concluded that the practice "does grave harm to the separation of powers doctrine, and the system of checks and balances that have sustained our democracy for more than two centuries".


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William Sessions, who had experience as both a practicing attorney and U.S. District Judge, was nominated as FBI director by President Ronald Reagan and sworn in on 2 November 1987. After serving under both Reagan and George H. W. Bush, Sessions was still in the post at the time of Bill Clinton's ...
James Comey has made history, but not in the way he would have wanted: In the 82-year history of the modern FBI, he's only the second of the nation's top law enforcement officials to be fired by a sitting president. The first was FBI Director William Sessions, whom President Bill Clinton fired in 1993 amid ...

He did so after the Department of Justice produced a 161-page internal report with sworn testimony from more than 100 FBI agents citing the numerous and severe ethical failures of its director, William Sessions. Clinton called Sessions twice the day he fired him -- once to inform him he was dismissed and ...
Only one FBI Director has ever been fired and that was William Sessions, who was fired in 1993 by then-President Bill Clinton. MSNBC's Morning Joe reminded viewers of that piece of recent history Wednesday morning, airing footage of Tom Brokaw reporting on Sessions' firing July 19, 1993. "It was a ...
President Bill Clinton, accompanied by Attorney General Janet Reno, gestures as he discusses the firing of FBI Director William Sessions on July 19, 1993. ... William S. Sessions, fired in July 1993, was until Tuesday the only FBI director dismissed in the middle of a 10-year term. He claimed politics led to ...
But the only other time a president has actually fired an FBI Director came two decades after that, and in quite different circumstances. William Sessions was appointed FBI director by Ronald Reagan in 1987. By the early '90s, however, his career was in a downward spiral. "Ever since she took her job," ...

One fun fact is this: Trump isn't the first president to can an FBI director. But the public reaction -- and the circumstances -- surrounding the two cases couldn't be more different. Nearly a quarter-century ago, President Bill Clinton fired FBI Director William Sessions. It was July 19, 1993, and Clinton was the ...
James Comey's abrupt firing as FBI Director took Washington -- and the nation -- by surprise Tuesday, but he is not the first bureau chief to be dismissed by a president. William Sessions -- no relation to current Attorney General Jeff Sessions -- served as director of the FBI from Nov. 2, 1987, until July 19, ...
In its 109-year history, only one F.B.I. director had been fired -- until Tuesday, when President Trump fired James B. Comey. In July 1993, President Bill Clinton fired William S. Sessions, who had been nominated to the post by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. Mr. Clinton said his attorney general, Janet ...
It's been 24 years since a president fired the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1993, President Clinton ousted William Sessions as FBI Director after Sessions refused to voluntarily step down amid ethical concerns. It was the first and only time to happen in U.S. history. That is, until Donald ...
"Instead of the FBI director serving at the pleasure of the president, this ... FBI Director to be dismissed prematurely was William Sessions in ...
Somewhat ironically, the only fired FBI Director is Jeff Sessions' father, Judge William Sessions. He was removed by President Bill Clinton after ...
Apart from once, it has never been recorded that a US Senator voted against a person designated for the position of the FBI director, but it ...
He is the second FBI director ever to be fired. ... time this happened was when Clinton fired William Sessions after he refused to step down amid ...
Comey was just the second FBI director to be fired by a president, after President Bill Clinton fired William S. Sessions in 1993.
The only other time in history an FBI director was fired, it was under ... The Justice Department's report about William Sessions, published in ...
Many critics of President Trump's decision to fire FBI director James ... Only one FBI Director has ever been fired and that was William Sessions, ...

William Sessions was appointed FBI director by Ronald Reagan in 1987. By the early '90s, however, his career was in a downward spiral.
William S. Sessions, fired in July 1993, was until Tuesday the only FBI director ... FBI Director William Sessions, right, was fired in July 1993 by ...
Nearly a quarter-century ago, President Bill Clinton fired FBI Director William Sessions. It was July 19, 1993, and Clinton was the first President ...
James Comey's abrupt firing as FBI Director took Washington -- and the nation -- by surprise Tuesday, but he is not the first bureau chief to be ...
William Sessions, named FBI director by President Ronald Reagan but fired ... 1993, his FBI Director was William S. Sessions, serving an appointment ... According to his FBI biography, William Steele Sessions was born May ...
It's been 24 years since a president fired the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1993, President Clinton ousted William Sessions ...
Given its 109-year history, the FBI has seen many scandals and .... Later came William Sessions, a former federal judge who took the job under ...
Other nominees -- Clarence Kelley, William Sessions and Robert Mueller -- were confirmed by 96-0, 90-0, 98-0 margins, respectively.
In 1993, President Bill Clinton fired the director of the FBI. The man, William Sessions (no relation to Attorney General Jeff Sessions), had used FBI vehicles to shuttle his wife to get manicures; he had bumped colleagues off flights to make room for ...
In July 1993, President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions as FBI director after allegations were made that Sessions used government resources for personal travel and that leadership conflicts existed within the Bureau.
(Vyto Starinskas/The Rutland Herald via AP, File). FILE - In a Jan. 22, 2010 file photo, Janet Jenkins is sworn in as a witness in Rutland Family Court, in Rutland, Vt.
Vermont U.S. District Court Judge William Sessions on Monday, March 20, 2017, ruled that a lawsuit filed by Janet Jenkins, whose former civil union partner fled the country with their child rather than share custody, is being allowed to proceed because ...
(Vyto Starinskas/The Rutland Herald via AP, File). FILE - In a Jan. 22, 2010 file photo, Janet Jenkins is sworn in as a witness in Rutland Family Court, in Rutland, Vt.
In July 1993, President Bill Clinton dismissed William Sessions as FBI director after allegations were made that Sessions used government resources for personal travel and that leadership conflicts existed within the Bureau.
FBI Director James Comey is set to face probing questions Monday about Russia's involvement in the presidential election at a highly anticipated public appearance before the House Intelligence Committee.
After all, President William Jefferson Clinton fired FBI director William Sessions midway through his 10 year term only seven months after WJC's inauguration.
Washington is rife with political warfare, as 2016's presidential electoral combat spills over into Donald Trump's presidency and shows no signs of abating.
(CNN) - Chaos has been an organizing principle of Donald Trump's young presidency. And from what we know of the White House's inner workings, it applies as much to personnel as policy.
Chaos has been an organizing principle of Donald Trump's young presidency. And from what we know of the White House's inner workings, it applies as much to personnel as policy.
"Prather fails to satisfy either of those requirements," U.S. District Judge William Sessions wrote for the court. Sessions, from the District of Vermont, sat on the panel by designation.
The European Union and the governments of France and Germany implored the United States to halt his execution, as did Amnesty International and the former FBI Director William Sessions. A Democrat in the Georgia senate, Vincent Fort, called on those ...
We should also recall that it was Bill Clinton in 1993 who helped the intelligence agencies turn partisan by firing William S. Sessions, the director of the FBI (1987-1993, an appointment by Ronald Reagan); Clinton was assisted in forcing the ...
In 2011, the group suggested developing an ordinance based on standards developed by former FBI Director William Sessions and implemented in other cities. Those standards would require reasonable suspicion of criminal activity or a threat to public ...
The modern era of the FBI's antagonism toward the White House began on January 19, 1993, in the final hours of George H. W. Bush's presidency.
Prior to joining the peace Corps, she worked at the FBI for 23 years, most notably serving as the chief speechwriter for FBI directors William Webster and William Sessions from 1986 to 1990, and as chief of Research/Communications for FBI Director's ...
Indeed, the powers of the FBI are such that if, as president, Mr. Trump ordered the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, to close the inquiry, Mr. Comey could choose to rebuff him.
F.B.I. directors are given 10-year terms to insulate them from political pressure, but the president still has the power to fire a director, as President Bill Clinton did with William S. Sessions in 1993 after a Justice Department investigation ...
Indeed, the powers of the FBI are such that if, as president, Mr. Trump ordered the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, to close the inquiry, Mr. Comey could choose to rebuff him.
But presidents can remove a director, as Bill Clinton did in 1993, when he fired FBI Director William Sessions halfway through his first year in office over allegations of ethical issues.
Comey drew biting criticism at various points from Republicans and Democrats over the FBI's handling of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of state.
But presidents can remove a director, as Bill Clinton did in 1993, when he fired FBI Director William S. Sessions halfway through his first year in office over allegations of ethical issues.
And they work for numerous agencies within the attorney general and Justice Department's office, including the FBI, the DEA, the immigration courts.
And they work for numerous agencies within the attorney general and Justice Department's office, including the FBI, the DEA, the immigration courts.


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