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 CIA's Propaganda Assets Inventory

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updated Fri. January 26, 2018

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In a 1995 article for the Independent, journalist and historian Frances Stonor Saunders explains, "Dismayed at the appeal communism still had for many intellectuals and artists in the West, the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and information entities prepared to play whatever tune Wisner chose. "The network included journalists, columnists, book Publishers, editors, entire organizations such ...

During the 1950s and 60s, the CIA's "Propaganda Assets Inventory" division paraded America's creative and intellectual freedom in front of the world - especially Russia, where artists were bound by the government's ideological straightjacket. At its peak, employees joked that the assets division was like a ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and information entities prepared to play whatever tune Wisner chose. "The network included journalists, columnists, book Publishers, editors, entire organizations such ...
Though the article remains vague on this point -- despite being impressively long-winded on so much else -- the CIA did set up a division in 1947 called the Propaganda Assets Inventory that, at its height, influenced more than 800 newspapers, magazines, and public organizations. Throughout the war ...
The decision to include culture and art in the US Cold War arsenal was taken as soon as the CIA was founded in 1947. Dismayed at the appeal communism still had for many intellectuals and artists in the West, the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could ...

In a 1995 article for the Independent, journalist and historian Frances Stonor Saunders explains, "Dismayed at the appeal communism still had for many intellectuals and artists in the West, the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and information entities prepared to play whatever tune Wisner chose. "The network included journalists, columnists, book Publishers, editors, entire organizations such ...
During the 1950s and 60s, the CIA's "Propaganda Assets Inventory" division paraded America's creative and intellectual freedom in front of the world - especially Russia, where artists were bound by the government's ideological straightjacket. At its peak, employees joked that the assets division was like a ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and information entities prepared to play whatever tune Wisner chose. "The network included journalists, columnists, book Publishers, editors, entire organizations such ...
Though the article remains vague on this point -- despite being impressively long-winded on so much else -- the CIA did set up a division in 1947 called the Propaganda Assets Inventory that, at its height, influenced more than 800 newspapers, magazines, and public organizations. Throughout the war ...
The decision to include culture and art in the US Cold War arsenal was taken as soon as the CIA was founded in 1947. Dismayed at the appeal communism still had for many intellectuals and artists in the West, the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could ...
... the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 newspapers, magazines ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and ...
During the 1950s and 60s, the CIA's "Propaganda Assets Inventory" division paraded America's creative and intellectual freedom in front of the ...
Wisner maintained the top secret "Propaganda Assets Inventory," better known as "Wisner's Wurlitzer"--a virtual rolodex of over 800 news and ...

... impressively long-winded on so much else -- the CIA did set up a division in 1947 called the Propaganda Assets Inventory that, at its height, ...
... the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 newspapers, magazines ...
... the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 newspapers, magazines ...
... the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 newspapers, magazines ...
... spazio di manovra sulla stampa: centinaia di organi d'informazione manovrati attraverso la nuova Divisione Propaganda Assets Inventory.
In a 1995 article for the Independent, journalist and historian Frances Stonor Saunders explains, "Dismayed at the appeal communism still had for many intellectuals and artists in the West, the new agency set up a division, the propaganda Assets ...
Dismayed at the appeal communism still had for many intellectuals and artists in the West, the new agency set up a division, the Propaganda Assets Inventory, which at its peak could influence more than 800 newspapers, magazines and public information ...
During the 1950s and 60s, the CIA's "Propaganda Assets Inventory" division paraded America's creative and intellectual freedom in front of the world - especially Russia, where artists were bound by the government's ideological straightjacket.


 

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