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 Buchanan Renewables

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updated Thu. March 1, 2018

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Between 2008 and 2011, OPIC approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables' biofuel project in Liberia. Instead of rejuvenating smallholder rubber farms and converting the old trees into biofuel, Buchanan Renewables perpetrated livelihood destruction, severe worker ...
A Buchanan Renewables worker injured when a tree fell on her as a result of poor safety precautions in Liberia. She still suffers and is unable to work today. (Photo courtesy of Accountability Counsel). Here at Accountability Counsel, we've seen first-hand how projects sold as impact investments can have ...

THE STORY WAS similar with the much-touted Buchanan Renewables, who with backing from the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, a little known U.S. government agency, received some US$217 million in loan approvals from 2008 to 2011to convert nonproducing rubber trees into biomass chips ...
On a scorching day back in April 2013, among the ruins of a failed U.S.-backed development project, Liberian women gathered to tell their stories of sexual abuse and exploitation at the hands of Buchanan Renewables bosses. The U.S. Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) approved $217 ...
On the ground in Liberia, Buchanan Renewables' CEO was James Steele, a larger-than-life former U.S. military figure and onetime Texas business partner of OPIC's then-president and CEO, Robert Mosbacher Jr. Mosbacher's father was Commerce secretary under President George H.W. Bush.

The formal complaint to OPIC, which has since withdrawn from the area, states: "OPIC, in violation of its social and environmental rules, failed to require an appropriate level of due diligence regarding [Buchanan Renewables'] operations in Liberia and did not take adequate action to stop or remedy the ...
Meanwhile, a Dutch-based company called Buchanan Renewables is turning millions of rubber trees that no longer yield resin into wood chips for sale to European power stations. The roads around the rubber plantations are covered with chips that have fallen off the trucks that head every 10 minutes or so ...
Buchanan Renewables treads a careful line between profit and social responsibility. Most of the money for the project comes from a Canadian millionaire, John McCall MacBain, who made a fortune from classified advertising before selling his company and setting up a charitable foundation. His foundation ...
The salvage operation was carried out by Buchanan Renewables, a Geneva-based company which is building a 35-megawatt power plant to provide electricity to the capital and surrounding area. The Overseas Private Investment Corporation, a U.S. government agency, is providing U.S. $112 million in ...
Between 2008 and 2011, OPIC approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables' biofuel project in Liberia. Instead of rejuvenating smallholder rubber farms and converting the old trees into biofuel, Buchanan Renewables perpetrated livelihood destruction, severe worker ...
A Buchanan Renewables worker injured when a tree fell on her as a result of poor safety precautions in Liberia. She still suffers and is unable to work today. (Photo courtesy of Accountability Counsel). Here at Accountability Counsel, we've seen first-hand how projects sold as impact investments can have ...
THE STORY WAS similar with the much-touted Buchanan Renewables, who with backing from the Overseas Private Investment corporation, a little known U.S. government agency, received some US$217 million in loan approvals from 2008 to 2011to convert nonproducing rubber trees into biomass chips ...
On a scorching day back in April 2013, among the ruins of a failed U.S.-backed development project, Liberian women gathered to tell their stories of sexual abuse and exploitation at the hands of Buchanan Renewables bosses. The U.S. Overseas Private Investment corporation (OPIC) approved $217 ...
On the ground in Liberia, Buchanan Renewables' CEO was James Steele, a larger-than-life former U.S. military figure and onetime Texas business partner of OPIC's then-president and CEO, Robert Mosbacher Jr. Mosbacher's father was commerce secretary under President George H.W. Bush.
The formal complaint to OPIC, which has since withdrawn from the area, states: "OPIC, in violation of its social and environmental rules, failed to require an appropriate level of due diligence regarding [Buchanan Renewables'] operations in Liberia and did not take adequate action to stop or remedy the ...
Meanwhile, a Dutch-based company called Buchanan Renewables is turning millions of rubber trees that no longer yield resin into wood chips for sale to European power stations. The roads around the rubber plantations are covered with chips that have fallen off the trucks that head every 10 minutes or so ...

Buchanan Renewables treads a careful line between profit and social responsibility. Most of the money for the project comes from a Canadian millionaire, John McCall MacBain, who made a fortune from classified advertising before selling his company and setting up a charitable foundation. His foundation ...
The salvage operation was carried out by Buchanan Renewables, a Geneva-based company which is building a 35-megawatt power plant to provide electricity to the capital and surrounding area. The Overseas Private Investment corporation, a U.S. government agency, is providing U.S. $112 million in ...
Between 2008 and 2011, OPIC approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables' biofuel project in Liberia. Instead ...
A Buchanan Renewables worker injured when a tree fell on her as a result of poor safety precautions in Liberia. She still suffers and is unable ...
THE STORY WAS similar with the much-touted Buchanan Renewables, who with backing from the Overseas Private Investment corporation, ...
The U.S. Overseas Private Investment corporation (OPIC) approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables to ...
The company, Buchanan Renewables, dismissed 600 workers and left the country amid complaints of workplace injuries, environmental harm ...
In early 2013, Buchanan Renewables shuttered its Liberian operations and dismissed 600 workers. It never built a promised power plant, ...
... and Buchanan Renewables, a Dutch-registered company, was completed, leaving the local communities unable to sustain their livelihoods.
Meanwhile, a Dutch-based company called Buchanan Renewables is turning millions of rubber trees that no longer yield resin into wood chips ...
The salvage operation was carried out by Buchanan Renewables, a Geneva-based company which is building a 35-megawatt power plant to ...
Between 2008 and 2011, OPIC approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables' biofuel project in Liberia. Instead ...
THE STORY WAS similar with the much-touted Buchanan Renewables, who with backing from the Overseas Private Investment corporation, ...
The U.S. Overseas Private Investment corporation (OPIC) approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables to ...
The company, Buchanan Renewables, dismissed 600 workers and left the country amid complaints of workplace injuries, environmental harm ...
The company, Buchanan Renewables, dismissed 600 workers and left the country amid complaints of workplace injuries, environmental harm ...
In early 2013, Buchanan Renewables shuttered its Liberian operations and dismissed 600 workers. It never built a promised power plant, ...
... and Buchanan Renewables, a Dutch-registered company, was completed, leaving the local communities unable to sustain their livelihoods.
Meanwhile, a Dutch-based company called Buchanan Renewables is turning millions of rubber trees that no longer yield resin into wood chips ...
The salvage operation was carried out by Buchanan Renewables, a Geneva-based company which is building a 35-megawatt power plant to ...
Between 2008 and 2011, OPIC approved $217 million in "development" financing for Buchanan Renewables' biofuel project in Liberia.
THE STORY WAS similar with the much-touted Buchanan Renewables, who with backing from the Overseas Private Investment corporation, a little known U.S.
In Liberia, OPIC's failed investment into Buchanan Renewables' biomass project drove farmers into poverty, contaminated water, and involved sexual abuse of local women, among other catastrophes.
Among them are BHP Billiton, Putu Mining, Buchanan Renewables and a host of others. BHP, which signed an estimated US$3 billion agreement with Liberia, but sold its interest to Cavala in 2015.


 

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