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 Magnus effect

The Magnus effect is the phenomenon whereby a spinning object flying in a fluid creates a whirlpool of fluid around itself, and experiences a force perpendicular to the line of motion and away from the direction of spin. The overall behaviour is similar to that around an aerofoil (see lift force) with a circulation which is generated by the mechanical rotation, rather than by aerofoil action.[1] In many ball sports, the Magnus effect is responsible for the curved motion of a spinning ball. The effect also affects spinning missiles, and is used in some flying machines.


German physicist Heinrich Magnus first described the effect in 1853, but according to James Gleick, [2] Isaac Newton described it and correctly theorised the cause 180 years earlier, after observing tennis players in his Cambridge college.

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updated Wed. March 21, 2018

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This is known as the Magnus effect. This reduced friction together with its high relative mass and angular momentum, allows Halospheres to accelerate to extreme velocities. The halo effects are a result of its spherical shape. Halospheres Forged from steel and plated in real gold, Halospheres is a real ...
Rotor Sails are deck-mounted rotating cylinders that utilise the Magnus effect to create a propulsive thrust. The Magnus effect is a force that acts on a spinning body in a moving airstream. Because the Magnus effect acts perpendicularly to the direction of the airstream, the optimum wind direction for Flettner ...

In the early 20th century, scientists proposed using the Magnus effect to propel ships. German engineer Anton Flettner replaced 420 square meters of sail cloth on the schooner Buckau with two 15-meter-tall steel rotor sails, which were set spinning using a small engine. Flettner showed that wind traveling ...
[PeterSripol] has made an RC model airplane but instead of using normal wings he decided to try getting it to fly using some KFC chicken buckets instead. Two KFC buckets in the place of wings were attached to a motor which spins the buckets up to speed. With a little help from the Magnus effect this ...
The reason this works is because of something called the Magnus effect. In essence, if an airborne object like a sphere or a cylinder gets enough spin, it will curve from a straight flight path based on the way air travels around the spinning object. This is the same force that lead to that viral gliding basketball ...
Have you ever wondered how football players are able to bend the ball like they do? Perhaps you've noticed how other spinning solid objects seem to magically move sideways as they fall? Why is this? It all comes down to the wonder of the Magnus Effect. In this article, we'll have a quick look at what it is ...

So, just cause it's the sweet space between Christmas and New Year's doesn't mean you can't still learn new, cool things — like physics. Today's coolness is the Magnus effect, which is all about how spinning, flying things get driven sideways. You've seen this in the way spin on a tennis ball can make it do ...
Next, by blowing into the steel nozzle that's included, an additional force is then created to accelerate the spheres. Once the angle is just right, users can see the spheres themselves reach unbelievably high speeds. In order to achieve its extreme velocity, Halospheres utilizes the Magnus effect to generate ...
Rotor Sails are deck-mounted rotating cylinders that utilise the Magnus effect to create a propulsive thrust. The Magnus effect is a force that acts on a spinning body in a moving airstream. Because the Magnus effect acts perpendicularly to the direction of the airstream, the optimum wind direction for Flettner ...
The culprit is unwanted ball spin – the 'Magnus effect' for any geeks out there. Ball spin is commonly talked about as a combination of backspin (needed to keep the ball in flight) and sidespin (generally unwanted – causes the ball to hook or slice). If we're being pedantic we'd call combining the above a ...
Instead it is exploitation of a phenomenon known as the Magnus effect named after German scientist Gustav Magnus who first described the concept in 1852. To take advantage of the effect the rotors must be powered and capable of moving in forward and reverse directions depending on the wind direction ...
And then, there is also the Magnus effect,” Gallis explained. To illustrate the Magnus effect, he references a widely popular video on Youtube in which a basketball is thrown downward in a dam two times. “The basketball thrown straight down lands where you might expect it, but the one tossed with a ...
In the early 20th century, scientists proposed using the Magnus effect to propel ships. German engineer Anton Flettner replaced 420 square meters of sail cloth on the schooner Buckau with two 15-meter-tall steel rotor sails, which were set spinning using a small engine. Flettner showed that wind traveling ...
[PeterSripol] has made an RC model airplane but instead of using normal wings he decided to try getting it to fly using some KFC chicken buckets instead. Two KFC buckets in the place of wings were attached to a motor which spins the buckets up to speed. With a little help from the Magnus effect this ...
The reason this works is because of something called the Magnus effect. In essence, if an airborne object like a sphere or a cylinder gets enough spin, it will curve from a straight flight path based on the way air travels around the spinning object. This is the same force that lead to that viral gliding basketball ...
Rotor sails work by harnessing the Magnus Effect. The vertical rods won't catch much wind, but relative to their surface area rotor sails are manifold more efficient at creating thrust than conventional sails. The reason is that they harness something called the Magnus Effect to generate thrust instead of being ...
The principle behind the rotor sail is called the Magnus effect. When wind passes the spinning rotor sail, the air flow accelerates on one side and decelerates on the opposite side. 2. This creates a thrust force that is perpendicular to the wind flow direction. This effect is also seen when a spinning ball, such ...

Have you ever wondered how football players are able to bend the ball like they do? Perhaps you've noticed how other spinning solid objects seem to magically move sideways as they fall? Why is this? It all comes down to the wonder of the Magnus Effect. In this article, we'll have a quick look at what it is ...
So, just cause it's the sweet space between Christmas and New Year's doesn't mean you can't still learn new, cool things — like physics. Today's coolness is the Magnus effect, which is all about how spinning, flying things get driven sideways. You've seen this in the way spin on a tennis ball can make it do ...
Ook bijzonder zijn de 'Magnus effect' stabilisatoren, die een perfecte roldemping bieden. Er is een uitgebreid 48V systeem en een generator ...
The fully immersive nature of the RBI-VR hitting experience is based on a physics engine built by Monsterful VR which accurately replicates the Magnus Effect ...
This is called the Magnus effect. The difference in pressure creates thrust that pushes the ship forward, just like how pressure different between ...
The “typhoon turbine” as it is known works via the Magnus effect, where a spinning object directs air around it faster on one side than on the ...
The result is a pressure difference, known as the Magnus effect, which propels the ship forward. The same phenomenon can be seen in spin ...
And then, there is also the Magnus effect,” Gallis explained. To illustrate the Magnus effect, he references a widely popular video on Youtube in ...
Rotor sails rely on a bit of aerodynamics known as the Magnus effect. In the 1850s, German physicist Heinrich Gustav Magnus noticed that ...
With a little help from the Magnus effect this creates lift. Many different configurations were tried to get this contraption off the ground.
The reason this works is because of something called the Magnus effect. In essence, if an airborne object like a sphere or a cylinder gets ...
The buckets are using the Magnus effect, first discovered in 1852 by Gustav Magnus. It's the same principal that's used when you are shooting ...
The principle behind the rotor sail is known as the Magnus Effect. The difference in the speed of the air flow around a spinning cylinder results ...
The principle behind the rotor sail is called the Magnus effect. When wind passes the spinning rotor sail, the air flow accelerates on one side ...
You can see the Magnus Effect all around us, it often excites or upsets us (well if you're a sports fan). It has helped to claw victory from defeat in ...
You can see the Magnus Effect all around us, it often excites or upsets us (well if you're a sports fan). It has helped to claw victory from defeat in ...
Today's coolness is the Magnus effect, which is all about how spinning, flying things get driven sideways. You've seen this in the way spin on a ...
Today's coolness is the Magnus effect, which is all about how spinning, flying things get driven sideways. You've seen this in the way spin on a ...
"[Our] Advanced Ballistics does an extremely realistic bullet simulation with wind, Coriolis and magnus effect, air pressure, and humidity all ...
The result is a pressure difference, known as the Magnus effect, which propels the ship forward. The same phenomenon can be seen in spin ...
And then, there is also the Magnus effect,” Gallis explained. To illustrate the Magnus effect, he references a widely popular video on Youtube in ...
The design relies an aerodynamic principle called the Magnus effect, identified by German physicist Heinrich Gustav Magnus in the 1850s.
Rotor sails rely on a bit of aerodynamics known as the Magnus effect. In the 1850s, German physicist Heinrich Gustav Magnus noticed that ...
... been leading Australia's contribution to popular science online and around the world, with 35 million views for his video on the Magnus effect.
From the shiny and rough surfaces dictating the swing of the ball to the magnus effect used by the spinners, from the technology of the Hotspot ...
We've all made a tiny ping-pong ball float on a hair dryer, but what YouTube's Veritasium is demonstrating here—a giant styrofoam ball floating ...
With a little help from the Magnus effect this creates lift. Many different configurations were tried to get this contraption off the ground.
The buckets are using the Magnus effect, first discovered in 1852 by Gustav Magnus. It's the same principal that's used when you are shooting ...
The reason this works is because of something called the Magnus effect. In essence, if an airborne object like a sphere or a cylinder gets ...
The principle behind the rotor sail is known as the Magnus Effect. The difference in the speed of the air flow around a spinning cylinder results ...
The principle behind the rotor sail is called the Magnus effect. When wind passes the spinning rotor sail, the air flow accelerates on one side ...
You can see the Magnus Effect all around us, it often excites or upsets us (well if you're a sports fan). It has helped to claw victory from defeat in ...
It all comes down to the wonder of the Magnus Effect. In this article, we'll have a quick look at what it is and how you can see it in action.


 

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   effects
     magnus

named effects in physics:
     aharonov‑bohm
     barkhausen
     bernoulli
     biefeld‑brown
     boundary layer
     casimir
     cherenkov
     coanda
     compton
     coriolis
     doppler
     edison
     faraday
     ferroelectric
     hall
     josephson
     leidenfrost
     magnus
     meissner
     mossbauer
     photoelectric
     skin