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 postglacial rebound

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updated Sun. March 3, 2019

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In a video viewed 92,000 times since Monday, Youtuber “MrMBB333” claims that the earthquakes were due to what's called “postglacial rebound,” a naturally-occurring process by which lands, once depressed by the weight of a glacier, slowly rise after glaciers recede. The “unweighting” of the lands can ...
The gradient of air temperature with elevation (the temperature lapse rate) in the tropics is predicted to become less steep during the coming century as surface temperature rises, enhancing the threat of warming in high-mountain environments. However, the sensitivity of the lapse rate to climate change is ...

The Alps are steadily "growing" by about one to two millimeters per year. Likewise, the formerly glaciated subcontinents of North America and Scandinavia are also undergoing constant upward movement. This is due to the fact that at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) about 18,000 years ago the ...
The Alps are steadily "growing" by about one to two millimeters per year. Likewise, the formerly glaciated subcontinents of North America and Scandinavia are also undergoing constant upward movement. This is due to the fact that at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) about 18,000 years ago the ...
But when the ice melts away or gets thinner during warmer periods, the crust starts to bounce back, a process called postglacial rebound. In other words, it gets pressed down, but it gets up again, and we're never going to keep it down. New GPS measurements reported in the paper found that in some ...
[Response: Postglacial rebound was discovered in the 19th Century, just check out Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-glacial_rebound#Discovery. It has been happening since the last deglaciation, and its rate changes over longer timescales than the ones we focused on here. It is close to ...

Figure 4 — rates of crustal uplift (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment/postglacial rebound) based on data and modeling from Paulson (2007). This post has focused only on one aspect of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment — the downward flexing of the Earth's crust in the vicinity of loading by giant ice sheets, but there's ...
... almost exclusively caused by the so called postglacial "rebound effect" -- i.e. the upward motion of the crust due to the thawing of the glaciers.
... almost exclusively caused by the so called postglacial "rebound effect" - i.e. the upward motion of the crust due to the thawing of the glaciers.
This upsurge is termed postglacial rebound. Science is unable to exactly measure the ice sheet shrinkage by tracking changes in the surface ...
This uplift, called postglacial rebound, means that scientists can't measure how much an ice sheet is shrinking by simply tracking changes in its ...
But when the ice melts away or gets thinner during warmer periods, the crust starts to bounce back, a process called postglacial rebound.
... the once submerged Earth would slowly rebound in some spots (a process sometimes called "isostatic uplift" or "postglacial rebound").
President Barack Obama launched America's most ambitious-ever attempt to tackle greenhouse gas emissions on Monday night, pushing ...
St Marys River Flow Graph.jpg View full size The flow through the St. Marys River is on a downward trend. The flow amount peaked in the early ...
... suppresses earthquakes, so when this ice melts, the pressure release can trigger earthquakes in a movement known as postglacial rebound.
This uplift is called postglacial rebound and it means that you can't measure how much an ice sheet is shrinking just by tracking changes in surface elevation.

Postglacial rebound, uplift in Greenland blamed on global warming, has actually made it harder to measure ice loss due to global warming, according to a new paper in Science Advances.
This upsurge is termed postglacial rebound. Science is unable to exactly measure the ice sheet shrinkage by tracking changes in the surface elevation.
... filled with happy diatoms, dying and lining the ocean floor in front of the remnant glaciers of the Wilkes and Aurora basins, the once submerged Earth would slowly rebound in some spots (a process sometimes called "isostatic uplift" or "postglacial ...
These calculations do take postglacial rebound into account, but the new research suggests that Greenland is bouncing back faster then previous studies had accounted for.
Parts of Scandinavia are still in this process of "postglacial rebound." Today, however, the natural rebound effect is exacerbated by human activity: "Every day the burning of fossil fuels adds more heat-trapping greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.


 

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