Schema-Root.org logo

 

  cross-referenced news and research resources about

 eudicots

The Eudicots, Eudicotidae or Eudicotyledons are a monophyletic clade of flowering plants that had been called tricolpates or non-magnoliid dicots by previous authors. The botanical terms were introduced in 1991 by evolutionary botanist James A. Doyle and paleobotanist Carol L. Hotton to emphasize the later evolutionary divergence of tricolpate dicots from earlier, less specialized, dicots. The close relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains was initially seen in morphological studies of shared derived characters. These plants have a distinct trait in their pollen grains of exhibiting three colpi or grooves paralleling the polar axis. Later molecular evidence confirmed the genetic basis for the evolutionary relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains and dicotyledonous traits. The term means "true dicotyledons" as it contains the majority of plants that have been considered dicots and have characteristics of the dicots. The term "Eudicots" has subsequently been widely adopted in botany to refer to one of the two largest clades of angiosperms (constituting over 70% of angiosperm species), monocots being the other. The remaining angiosperms are sometimes referred to as basal angiosperms or paleodicots but these terms have not been widely or consistently adopted as they do not refer to a monophyletic group.


The other name for the Eudicots is tricolpates, a name which refers to the grooved structure of the pollen. Members of the group have tricolpate pollen, or forms derived from it. These pollen have three or more pores set in furrows called colpi. In contrast, most of the other seed plants (that is the gymnosperms, the monocots and the paleodicots) produce monosulcate pollen, with a single pore set in a differently oriented groove called the sulcus. The name "tricolpates" is preferred by some botanists in order to avoid confusion with the dicots, a non-monophyletic group (Judd & Olmstead 2004).

Schema-Root.org logo
images:  google   yahoo YouTube
spacer

updated Wed. March 27, 2024

-
The last group is the eudicots, and from them we get our best loved flowers and fruits. Apples, cherries, oranges, peaches, pears and all the berries we eat, plus potatoes, cucumbers, broccoli, tomatoes, lettuce, beans and squash to name a few. Roses, hydrangeas, forsythia, lilacs, coneflowers, asters, ...

However, two groups which diverged during the Cretaceous some 100 million years ago (monocots and eudicots) did feature these structures. The period also coincides with the early evolution of flower-visiting insects, suggesting a connection between the two. For all these reasons, researchers believe ...
Cucurbits are members of a large group of flowering plants known collectively as eudicots. The genome-doubling followed comparatively soon after a chromosome tripling event in the eudicots' common ancestor around 107 million years ago. Wang says the team's discovery of repeated chromosome ...
This cucurbit-common doubling of chromosomes (tetraploidization) occurred after a flowering plant (eudicot) tripling event (hexaploidy) some 107-118 million years ago (Mya), which affected all Cucurbitaceae and core eudicot plants. "These repeated genome duplication events are proposed to answer for ...
Interestingly, triaperturate pollen associated with modern eudicot angiosperms has not been found prior to the 130m year mark. Angiosperm-like monoaperturate pollen has been found in older rocks, but may have been produced by other seed-producing plant groups, so cannot be taken alone as ...
The researchers also reconstructed what flowers looked like at all the key divergences in the flowering plant evolutionary tree, including the early evolution of monocots (e.g., orchids, lilies, and grasses) and eudicots (e.g., poppies, roses, and sunflowers), the two largest groups of flowering plants.
In addition to a genome duplication event common to all eudicots that occurred 122 million to 164 million years ago, the sunflower, as well as lettuce and artichoke, underwent a whole-genome triplication event — possibly independent genome duplication events that occurred close together in time ...
A technician scraped away clay to reveal compound leaves, which placed the specimen in the flowering plant group known as eudicots. Today most flowering plants are eudicots, but they were rare in the Early Cretaceous. Potomacapnos apeleutheron is the first North American eudicot ever found among ...


 

news and opinion


 


 


 


 


schema-root.org

   botany
    angiosperms
      eudicots
        rosids