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  cross-referenced news and research resources about

 China internet

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updated Sat. July 2, 2022

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... attempt to link Facebook's success to American capitalism, senator Dan Sullivan asked Zuckerberg if it would have been possible to start Facebook from his dorm room in a country like China, to which Zuckerberg replied, “Well, Senator, there are — there are some very strong Chinese internet companies.

Yet even as Ms. Lagarde and Mr. Xi talked about that openness, forum attendees were unable to use Google, log on to Facebook or post to Twitter about the event unless they found a way to bypass China's army of internet censors. In fact, aspects of the forum stand in stark contrast with the many ways ...
It's worth keeping in mind that Phoenix News, NetEase News, and Tiantian News are either directly controlled or heavily invested in by China's top internet companies — Phoenix New Media, NetEase, and Tencent recpectively. And all the three internet companies have gone public either in Hong Kong or ...
At the end of 2017, China's Communist Party Central Committee and the State Council jointly circulated an Action Plan for Promoting Scale Deployment of Internet Protocol Version 6(IPv6)(“Plan”), and set detailed targets and steps for the next few years, aiming full transition to IPv6 by 2025. According to the ...
The slapdown — which comes as China's government extends its internet controls to encompass not only what it finds politically subversive, but also what it deems unwholesome or pornographic — prompted quick declarations of remorse from the video apps' creators. "Content appeared on the platform ...
China State Grid Corporation, the country's state-owned electricity utility monopoly, is looking to blockchain technology to advance its plans for an "Internet of Energy." In a patent application filed to the China State Intellectual Property Office in November last year and released last week, the energy giant ...
Internet users have engaged in a debate on Weibo, China's Twitter-equivalent. Some are doubtful of the reason given by China, lambasting local publications for not reporting the "truth" -- that China has lost control of Tiangong-1. Others are accusing the non-believers of being "Chinese traitors" that are ...


 

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