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updated Fri. March 1, 2024

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In theory, the U.S. Commerce Department's move earlier this week to slap a seven-year ban on the sale of American products to ZTE Corp., China's second-largest telecommunications equipment manufacturer, was all about national security and had nothing to do with trade. In announcing the ban, ...
A deep-dive into the draft 2018 AUMF from Sens. Bob Corker (R.-Tenn.) and Tim Kaine (D.-Va.). Tune in for a very detailed review and debate. Meanwhile, Doe v. Mattis has suddenly moved into high gear. Looks like a transfer may be in the works, but we predict weeks of further litigation. The Supreme ...

Under Article 23 of the Basic Law, the city's mini-constitution, Hong Kong must enact its own national security legislation to prohibit treason and subversion. But the government's last attempt was shelved in 2003 after half a million residents took to the streets to oppose it, citing worries over civil liberties.
Severstal Export (a subsidiary of a Russian steel company) has sued the Trump administration over its steel tariffs, urging the Court of International Trade to treat Trump's stated national security justification as a pretext for protectionism. It's a lot like the Travel Ban litigation, but Severstal has lost round one ...
Welcome back to the National Security Law Podcast! This week, Professors Vladeck and Chesney review the following recent developments: A drone strike against AQIM targets in southwestern Libya: What if anything does this tell us about the Trump administration's legal and policy positions relating to the ...
State laws to that effect? Is the status quo fine? How should journalists talk about violence that causes fear in the community when it is not entirely clear why the perpetrator is carrying out such acts? John Bolton and law: A quick note on the new national security adviser's legal and policy orientation.

With apologies for short show notes, here are the headlines for this week's National Security Law Podcast: The McCabe firing. The prospect of legislation permitting judicial review of any decision to fire Mueller. An update of the declaration of Secretary Mattis explaining why he removed the GTMO military ...
“Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.” Archimedes died in 212 BC. There's no way he could have predicted the Internet of Things. But he did. Three unknown twenty-somethings said give us vulnerable home routers and DVR's and we'll take down the ...
Trump's ability to block the deal stems from a decades-old law that gives the president the authority to stop foreign firms from taking over US companies if there is a national security concern. And Monday was not the first time the power has been used. In recent years, presidents have given particular ...
Out on spring break but still listening to the podcast? We love it! Actually, your hosts are out on spring break too, but before they left town they sat down to record episode 63 on March 9. If things have gone crazy over the weekend, and you are surprised they aren't discussing them here—well, that's why!

President Trump's invocation of national security to justify new tariffs on steel imports: Is it plausible from a legal perspective? The war(s) in Yemen, a proposed joint resolution to limit America's military roles there, and a statement from DOD's GC providing a snapshot of views regarding the legal issues ...
LONDON — The British government has quietly acknowledged for the first time that it lets agents break domestic law to keep the country safe. The admission was contained in a formal statement describing secret instructions issued by the Prime Minister to Britain's security agencies, which include MI5 ...
No shortage of topics this week, but then again there was no shortage last week, or before that, or … ever. So, what's on tap? Tune in to explore: A host of Supreme Court developments, including action relating to DACA, immigration detention and the due process clause, Patchak and the question whether ...
No shortage of topics this week, but then again there was no shortage last week, or before that, or…ever. So, what's on tap? Tune in to hear Professor Chesney and I explore: A host of Supreme Court developments, including action relating to DACA, immigration detention and the due process clause, ...
The National Security Law Podcast: This Is Why We Can't Have Nice Things. By Robert Chesney, Steve Vladeck. Thursday ... An overly long episode with a short title to reflect a very busy—and somewhat bizarre—eight day stretch in the wide world of national security law. This week, your hosts weigh in on:.
We don't lack for topics this week! In today's episode, Professors Vladeck and Chesney eat a number of cookies while talking about the following: Rachel Brand steps down at the Justice Department. As George III might say, what comes next? Your hosts review the order of succession. A triple update on ...
Hong Kong's leader on Tuesday said the city was still not ready for national security legislation, even though Beijing officials have recently been ramping up reminders that laws against offences such as treason and sedition are overdue to tackle independence advocacy. “It is our constitutional duty to enact ...
A deep dive on the international law framework implicated by the U.S./U.K./France airstrikes on Syrian government facilities associated with chemical weapons (with a special emphasis on the U.K.'s asserted humanitarian intervention justification). An equally deep dive into the U.S. domestic law framework ...


 

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