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 United States v. Jones, 565 US ___, 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012)

United States v. Jones, 565 US ___, 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that installing a Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking device on a vehicle and using the device to monitor the vehicle's movements constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment.


In 2005 defendant Antoine Jones was suspected of drug trafficking. Police investigators asked for and received a warrant to attach a GPS tracking device to the underside of the defendant's car but then exceeded the warrant's scope in both geography and length of time. The Supreme Court justices voted unanimously that this violated the Fourth Amendment, though they were split on the reasoning. The majority held that by installing the GPS device on the defendants car the Police had committed a trespass on private property and that the trespass constituted a per se breach of the defendant's privacy.

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updated Mon. April 30, 2018

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And he's working with film director Tangie B. Moore, executive producer of Hollywood Hearts,on the tentatively titled United States v. Antoine Jones, based on his true-life legal battles. "I want people to know I am not anti-government; I am a patriot who believe in the United States Constitution," Jones told ...
“If you want to unclog traffic, the state already has an opt-in program called EZ Pass,” Whitehead suggests. “If you want to track suspect cars, police can put on a GPS. But you need a search warrant for that,” he said, citing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in United States v. Antoine Jones. The state's 76-page ...

It's been almost a month since the United States Supreme Court offered a decision in the case of United States v. Antoine Jones that was hailed as a major victory for privacy advocates. But upon reflection, it seems like while the court opened the door to stronger privacy laws, it never stepped through and ...
And he's working with film director Tangie B. Moore, executive producer of Hollywood Hearts,on the tentatively titled United States v. Antoine Jones, based on his true-life legal battles. "I want people to know I am not anti-government; I am a patriot who believe in the United States Constitution," Jones told ...
“If you want to unclog traffic, the state already has an opt-in program called EZ Pass,” Whitehead suggests. “If you want to track suspect cars, police can put on a GPS. But you need a search warrant for that,” he said, citing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in United States v. Antoine Jones. The state's 76-page ...
It's been almost a month since the United States Supreme Court offered a decision in the case of United States v. Antoine Jones that was hailed as a major victory for privacy advocates. But upon reflection, it seems like while the court opened the door to stronger privacy laws, it never stepped through and ...

And he's working with film director Tangie B. Moore, executive producer of Hollywood Hearts,on the tentatively titled United States v. Antoine Jones, based on his true-life legal battles. "I want people to know I am not anti-government; I am a patriot who believe in the United States Constitution," Jones told ...
Immediately following the 9/11 attacks against the United States, Congress .... overturned in a landmark 2012 decision because federal agents placed a GPS ... According to federal court proceedings, agents also raided Jones' Summit ... In U.S. v. Heal, DEA agents obtained a sneak and peek warrant to ...
“If you want to track suspect cars, police can put on a GPS. But you need a search warrant for that,” he said, citing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in United States v. Antoine Jones. The state's 76-page report acknowledges ...
It's been almost a month since the United States Supreme Court offered a decision in the case of United States v. Antoine Jones that was hailed ...
CIA spokeswoman Jennifer Youngblood said the agency does not spy inside the United States and also described the relationship with the CIA ...
Antoine Jones knows about being burgled by the government. ... in a landmark 2012 decision because federal agents placed a GPS trafficking device on his ... In U.S. v. Heal, DEA agents obtained a sneak and peek warrant to ...
“If you want to track suspect cars, police can put on a GPS. But you need a search warrant for that,” he said, citing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in United States v. Antoine Jones. The state's 76-page report acknowledges ...
RADIO ID: Virginia could become the first state in the nation to embed its ... “If you want to track suspect cars, police can put on a GPS. ... for that,” he said, citing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in United States v. Antoine Jones.
It's been almost a month since the United States Supreme Court offered a decision in the case of United States v. Antoine Jones that was hailed ...
CIA spokeswoman Jennifer Youngblood said the agency does not spy inside the United States and also described the relationship with the CIA ...
2012) [hereinafter NSIP] (quoting Final Report of the Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, United States Senate, 94th Cong., 2d Sess. Book I (1976) [hereinafter Church Report ..... To be sure, in ...

Gorsuch cited the Supreme Court case of United States v. Jones, involving a GPS tracking device attached by police to a car.
For example, Scalia wrote the court's 2012 decision in United States v. Jones, holding that a "search" took place when police officers attached a GPS device to the car of a suspected drug dealer and then used the device to track the car's movements.
Whereas Carloss dealt with physical property, in Ackerman, Judge Gorsuch applied Justice Scalia's trespass theory to searches of digital property: e-mails.
The first was United States v. Jones, in which police put a GPS tracker on this guy's car, and tried to track him to see if he was selling drugs.
In United States v. Jones a man had his Jeep tracked with GPS devices without a warrant, leading to a drug trafficking conviction.
In her United States v. Jones (2012) concurrence Justice Sotomayor made this very point, writing, "I would ask whether people reasonably expect that their movements will be recorded and aggregated in a manner that enables the Government to ascertain, ...
In United States v. Jones, a recent case concerning the government's covert installation of a GPS device on a criminal suspect's car, Justice Sonia Sotomayor considered the conclusions that police might draw from the record of a person's location over ...
His life sentence on drug trafficking charges was overturned in a landmark 2012 decision because federal agents placed a GPS trafficking device on his vehicle without a warrant, but he's still sitting in federal prison on another, 15-year federal ...
Urging the Supreme Court to review the case, EFF, along with the Brennan Center for Justice, the Center for Democracy & Technology, The Constitution Project and the National Coalition to Protect Civil Freedoms, cited a 2012 decision in which the ...
On March 2, 2012, the People notified Johnson of their intent to offer evidence of the Sutton, Jones, Mosley, and Coleman shootings at retrial.
The court's Monday ruling was, in part, based on a U.S. Supreme Court drug case, United States v. Jones, which ruled that a GPS tracking device requires a ruling of probable cause. "I think that some agencies have been a little more alert to following ...
The court's Monday ruling was, in part, based on a U.S. Supreme Court drug case, United States v. Jones, which ruled that a GPS tracking device requires a ruling of probable cause. "I think that some agencies have been a little more alert to following ...
The court's Monday ruling was, in part, based on a U.S. Supreme Court drug case, United States v. Jones, which ruled that a GPS tracking device requires a ruling of probable cause. "I think that some agencies have been a little more alert to following ...
The court's Monday ruling was, in part, based on a U.S. Supreme Court drug case, United States v. Jones, which ruled that a GPS tracking device requires a ruling of probable cause. "I think that some agencies have been a little more alert to following ...
In addition, under United States v. Jones, the Court maintains that physical trespasses coupled with the gathering of information will also implicate the Fourth Amendment, regardless of whether one has invaded a "reasonable expectation of privacy ...
... ill suited to the digital age," the phrase employed by Justice Sonya Sotomayor in her concurring opinion in United States v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945 (2012), in which the Supreme Court required a warrant for the use of a GPS tracking device on an ...
... and the court did sort of find in the Jones GPS case that that kind of constancy matters," Stanley said, referring to a 2012 Supreme Court case, United States v. Jones, in which it ruled that police putting a GPS tracker on someone's car is a ...
In the recent Supreme Court decision in United States v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945 (2012), the concurring opinions of Justices Sotomayor and Alito, joined by three other justices, critiqued the third party doctrine, expressing views that 21st century ...
In United States v. Jones, presented with a challenge to the use of GPS technology to monitor a suspect's movements on public roadways around-the-clock for 28 consecutive days, the Supreme Court's nine justices bandied about no less than three distinct ...
In 2012, in United States v. Jones, the Supreme Court decided that police could not slap a GPS tracker on a drug suspect's car and track its movement without a warrant.
He wrote the main opinion in United States v. Jones, holding that the Fourth Amendment governed long-term GPS surveillance of a suspected drug dealer's car.
2014); United States v. Jones, 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012). As such, law enforcement should have obtained a search ... (It only found that placing a GPS device on a vehicle is a search under the Fourth Amendment. The issue of real-time location tracking ...
McAllister pointed to U.S. Supreme Court's 2012 decision in United States v. Jones, 132 S.Ct. 945 ... McAllister contends the data gleaned from a Fitbit, GPS navigation device or another kind of high-tech gizmo is like any other evidence. To be ...
... government [is] no longer bound by its promises therein." United States v. Jones, 469 F.3d 563, 566 (6th Cir. ..... In the amended report and recommendation, issued in March 2012, the magistrate judge ruled that Fox had not shown that the state ...
He alleged that each time he viewed a video clip on the app that Gannett disclosed to an analytics third party: (1) the title of the video viewed; (2) his device's unique Android ID; and (3) the GPS coordinates of the device at the time the video was ...
The second would be for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide, but the court, in United States v. Jones, 131 S. Ct. 3064 (S.Ct. June 27, 2011), has shown that it is nothing close to united on the issue.
The second would be for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide, but the court, in United States v. Jones, 131 S. Ct. 3064 (S.Ct. June 27, 2011), has shown that it is nothing close to united on the issue.
In United States v. Jones (2012), the government claimed the power to attach a GPS device to a suspected drug dealer's car and monitor his movements without a warrant.
In United States v. Jones (2012), the government claimed the power to attach a GPS device to a suspected drug dealer's car and monitor his movements without a warrant.
Unlike GPS devices considered by the Supreme Court in United States v. Jones, "ELDs are not 'trespassorily inserted'" into trucks, and they don't violate "any reasonable expectation of privacy because they do not precisely track vehicles in real-time ...
And in United States v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945, 948-49, 954 (2012), the FBI and local law enforcement secretly installed a GPS tracking device on a suspect's vehicle and monitored the vehicle's movements for four weeks. The Fourth Circuit didn't view ...
In a concurring opinion to the Supreme Court's United States v. Jones, which held that police need a warrant to use GPS tracking, Sotomayor said the third-party doctrine "is ill-suited to the digital age," when "people reveal a great deal of ...
However, in United States v. Jones, a case from 2012 where the Supreme Court ruled that law enforcement must get a warrant to place a GPS tracker on a vehicle, Justice Sonia Sotomayor said in a concurrent opinion that it may be time for the Supreme ...


 

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U.S. Supreme Court Fourth Amendment decisions:
            olmstead v. united states
            smith v. maryland
            united states v. jones