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 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA)

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... as a result of Snowden's leaks, in May 2016 a Senate Judiciary Committee met to review the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Amendments Act. The act had allowed for mass surveillance by the government, including data collection without a warrant.
Recent years have witnessed explosive revelations about surveillance of Americans' electronic activity, focused on actions approved by a secretive federal court under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. ... The ACLU says the warrant appeared to ...

... post titled "Building on surveillance Reform," also identified new countries that made requests - Algeria, Belarus, and Saudi Arabia among them - and reveals that Google saw an increase in requests made under the Foreign intelligence Surveillance ...
They also briefed staff on the upcoming expiration of a law used to justify NSA surveillance of the Internet, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act. Nate (pictured right) also participated in a panel discussion for members ... The proposed changes to ...
If you're Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, or any other technology company that provides cloud services, then you spend a tremendous amount of time and energy responding to government requests for information.
... post titled "Building on surveillance Reform," also identified new countries that made requests - Algeria, Belarus, and Saudi Arabia among them - and reveals that Google saw an increase in requests made under the Foreign intelligence Surveillance ...

"Before producing data in response to a government request, we make sure it strictly follows the law, for example to compel us to disclose content in criminal cases we require the government use a search warrant, and that it complies with Google's ...
If you're Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, or any other technology company that provides cloud services, then you spend a tremendous amount of time and energy responding to government requests for information.
They also briefed staff on the upcoming expiration of a law used to justify NSA surveillance of the Internet, Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act. Nate (pictured right) also participated in a panel discussion for members ... The proposed changes to ...
There is strict electronic surveillance conditions as per the FISA or the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which was first passed in 1978.
In 2007 Yahoo fought a secret legal battle with FISC, challenging an order to turn over to the FBI and NSA -- without a warrant -- emails of customers living abroad who had been targeted for surveillance. ... The Yahoo operation appears to have been ...
There is strict electronic surveillance conditions as per the FISA or the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which was first passed in 1978.
The collection was authorized by a warrant issued by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA), according to a Reuters report Wednesday, citing two anonymous government sources.
Reuters has walked back its initial reporting that the order was issued under Section 702, and now agrees with the Times' earlier reporting that the FISA court granted a warrant under Title I of FISA. Meanwhile, Motherboard writes that the tool used by ...
We don't know exactly how the government justified the order to Yahoo - there's a spirited debate going on about whether it was the result of a FISA warrant, a 702 directive, or even a result of Executive Order 12333 - but however it happened, there ...
Yahoo's request came under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the sources said. The two sources said the request was issued under a provision of the law known as Section 702, which will expire on Dec. 31, 2017 ... The FISA Court warrant related ...
The collection in question was specifically authorized by a warrant issued by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, stated the two government sources, who requested anonymity to speak freely.

Under laws including the 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, intelligence agencies can ask U.S. phone and internet companies to provide customer data to aid foreign intelligence-gathering efforts for a variety of reasons ...
Yahoo's request came under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the sources said. The two sources said the request was issued under a provision of the law known as Section 702, which will expire on Dec. 31, 2017, unless lawmakers act to renew it ...
In the past, Yahoo had challenged orders for customer data, including in 2007 when the company fought and lost a directive to search customer accounts without a warrant. But this time, Yahoo did not challenge the data request, sparking division at the ...
... fourth amendment protects that fully. It's hard to see how the government justifies requiring Yahoo to search emails like that; there is no warrant that could possibly justify scanning all emails." ... Under laws including the 2008 amendments to ...
Yahoo in 2007 had fought a FISA demand that it conduct searches on specific email accounts without a court-approved warrant. Details of the case remain sealed, but a partially redacted published opinion showed Yahoo's challenge was unsuccessful.
Under laws including the 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, intelligence agencies can ask U.S. phone and internet companies to provide customer data to aid foreign intelligence-gathering efforts for a variety of reasons ...
Under laws including the 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, intelligence agencies can ask U.S. phone and internet companies to provide customer data to aid foreign intelligence-gathering efforts for a variety of reasons ...
As an alternative way to acquire records, the FBI began seeking information via warrant requests to the secretive surveillance panel - the FISA court, using section 215 of the Patriot Act. According to the report, apart from bulk data collection ...
In the wake of this, the FBI began acquiring the information it sought through warrant requests to the FISA court, a secret surveillance panel, using section 215 of the Patriot Act, which the inspector general notes is a slower process.
In the wake of this, the FBI began acquiring the information it sought through warrant requests to the FISA court, a secret surveillance panel, using section 215 of the Patriot Act, which the inspector general notes is a slower process.
... we've argued that the NSA is collecting massive amounts of data about US citizens under conditions that have nothing to do with terrorism or national security, thanks to the authorities granted to the US government by section 702 of the Foreign ...
Additionally, it revealed that despite collecting thousands of pieces of metadata, and despite nearly 20,000 separate warrants being issued in the past decade, less than 10 convictions have occurred since the start of the program. This means the ...
In the wake of the 2014 Snowden revelations about mass surveillance programs some startups with concerns about overreaching government requests for user data settled on Switzerland as a base for their business - owing to what they dubbed favorable ...
... collects millions of Internet communications between foreigners and Americans each year under section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act.
... Security Agency (NSA) initiatives to ask how much power the U.S. government should have under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) to conduct electronic surveillance, emergency eavesdropping, and physical searches without a warrant.
... most controversial mass surveillance programs - PRISM and Upstream - has not sufficiently acknowledged the broad scope of collection under these programs, which take place under section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA ...
One key source of these secret threats is the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) court system, which issues secret rulings that can function as secret law.
Less explained is the powerful Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (or "FISA Court"), established in 1978 and authorized to oversee our government's surveillance warrant requests on foreign spies operating inside the U.S. Or how Snowden's going ...
That leaves them open to be retrieved by police via a warrant, or possibly a simple request made to Google. Google said that storing conversations helps its machine learning algorithms ... according to the latest report. The most requests for user ...
They gave phone carriers and internet corporations legal immunity from personal suits if they would collect the data and hand it over to the US government any time the government issued a FISA "warrant" - which meant any time. ... decision of 1928, and ...
The FISA Amendments Act of 2008 (FAA) - the statute the government uses to engage in warrantless surveillance of Americans' international communications - is scheduled to expire in December 2017.
A Swedish appeals court upheld Julian Assange's six-year-old arrest warrant, after he challenged it again. The Wikileaks founder ... The arrest warrant is aimed at interrogating Assange; he hasn't been formally indicted. The statute of .... The supreme ...
Still there is a segment of the film-going public who never see documentaries and the subject is big enough to warrant a dramatic narrative film speak to that other audience.
The Electronic Security Act. All the FISA regulations that were governing telecommunications companies and any communications company, and all the laws that are behind all that.
The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA), which is a secret court that was supposed to protect our privacy rights, was rubber-stamping every NSA request for the authority to spy without any real oversight.
But wait a minute, says Edward, what about FISA? That's the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which dictates the rules of surveillance and says, in essence, that you need a warrant each time you cross one of those walls. Gabriel explains that FISA ...
... collects millions of Internet communications between foreigners and Americans each year under section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act.
December 15, 2005 - The New York Times reports that President Bush signed a presidential order in 2002 allowing the NSA to eavesdrop on Americans and others in the US (on international calls) without obtaining warrants through FISC. The newspaper ...
The history of the proceedings began in 2013 with the award by a federal magistrate's court in New York of a search warrant to the DOJ under the US Stored Communications Act of 1986 (SCA), which grants US law enforcement agencies certain powers to ...
Nor does Hayden appear to believe in U.S. laws and institutions, at least when it comes to the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which established the secret courts that are supposed to issue exactly the sort of warrant Hayden's program never ...
The opinion, issued on April 14 and released pursuant to the USA FREEDOM Act's disclosure requirements, deals with government collection of the numbers one dials into a phone during a call, such as a credit card number or passcode (called ...
Nor does Hayden appear to believe in U.S. laws and institutions, at least when it comes to the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which established the secret courts that are supposed to issue exactly the sort of warrant Hayden's program never ...
The warrant requirement is generally a tolerable proxy for "reasonableness" when the government is seeking to unearth evidence of criminal wrongdoing, but it fails properly to balance the interests at stake when the government is instead seeking to ...


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